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New Jerusalem

Go to Bible verses for: New Jerusalem

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Sermon; Jan 6, 2018
Ambassadors For Christ

Martin Collins, reflecting on an article by Dave Berry, who suggests that the Post-Truth, fake news norm has created a milieu where people appear to be hallucinating, warns God's called-out ones against feeling the same kind of frustration as the rest of society as we become immersed in negative and false news. If we accept our Elder Brother Jesus Christ's invitation to be protected by His name, becoming an Ambassador of the Sovereign of the universe, we can rise above the swamp of negativism and evil which threatens to envelop us. Because our citizenship is in heaven, we are members of God's family, metaphorically a component of God's Temple and a constituent of the Kingdom of God. In the current world, we are sojourners, pilgrims, aliens, and ambassadors, living among, yet separate from, the peoples of this present world. Our loyalty must be to the family to which we are called—the blood of Christ's sacrifice being thicker than water. We cannot be half-hearted Christians, attempting to take the narrow and broad way simultaneously. If we are not sure we are really committed to our calling, we should consider: (1.) Do we feel that we are an outsider when we are with our brethren? (2.) Do we feel more comfortable in "wordly" social contexts? (3.) Do we understand the argot of the Church family or does it seem foreign to us? (4.) Do we understand the subjects discussed and feel prepared to take part in the discussion or does everything seem like its in secret code? (5.) Are we in on the mysteries of the fellowship, or do we feel clueless? (6.) Do we feel comfortable with the laws of our fellowship or do they seem a burden? (7.) Do we have a spiritual birth certificate—God's Holy Spirit—that we carefully guard? If we are led by God's Spirit, having the spirit of adoption, we are the children of God and ambassadors of Jesus Christ.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 11, 2017
The Light of Day and the Dark of Night

Mike Ford focuses on Ecclesiastes 11:7-8, proclaiming that light is sweet and that it is a pleasure to see the sun. Even though still don't know a lot about the nature of light, God has revealed its cause and symbolic meaning in His scriptures. Light symbolizes God, righteousness and purity, while darkness symbolizes ignorance, evil, and depression. With day comes perception and hope, darkness brings fear and despair. When darkness spreads its pall over people's minds, they mistakenly believe God does not see their sins. Satan, the adversary dedicated to destruction, is the ruler of darkness and death. The Apostle John repeatedly emphasizes that God is light, and in Him there is categorically no darkness at all. If we keep His Commandments, we are walking in the light. If we hate our brother or if we become enticed by the ways of the world, we are living in darkness. Satan disguises himself as an angel of light and provides bright—but deadly—lures to his dens of sin. In the New Jerusalem, the luminosity (symbolic of righteousness) of God the Father, Jesus Christ and His Bride will obviate the light of sun and moon. It behooves God's called-out ones to walk in the light of righteousness, keeping His laws and commandments. We must not let the pulls of the flesh and the world conceal the light we reflect as we walk in the light of His Truth.

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Sermon; Mar 25, 2017
Passover and New Creation

Charles Whitaker, observing the plethora of pairings (binary opposites, dichotomies in Genesis 1 and 2 (day and night, male and female, sea and land, the Tree of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, etc.) asserts that during the first stage of Creation, God unleashed multiple universal processes of division or separation. In the New Creation in the fullness of time, God purposes to regather everything He has heretofore separated. After the Passover Jesus shared with His disciples up to the event of His crucifixion, the division between Jew and Gentile, male and female, slave and free, over the sun and under the sun, etc., was obliterated, initiating unification. During the New Order (New Heavens and the New Earth) described in Revelation, the division between night and day, as well as land and sea, will also be obliterated, indicating a thorough unification process. Consequently, God has shown His long-term plan as a two-phased project beginning as a lengthy separation process, followed by a reconciliation or unification process, in which all will be gathered, reconciled, and unified into the Body of Christ.

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Sermonette; Oct 24, 2016
The Light of the World

David Grabbe, reminding us that the "last great day of the Feast" is not the Eighth Day, asserts that everything from John 8:1 through John 10:21 took place on the Eighth Day. A common theme of His teachings on that day revolved around light and darkness, and twice on that Holy Day He proclaimed that He is the Light of the World. Light represents abundant life, truth, purity, and enlightenment, overcoming the depravity of sin and the darkness of ignorance and death. To give light is the essence of resurrecting them to life; as the Light of the world, Jesus can teach us to see what is right and the safe way to walk, shining brightly on the pitfalls of sin. Jesus is the only hope for those who dwell in darkness. On the eighth day, following the Millennium, the whole world will walk in the light as the New Jerusalem descends out of Heaven, fulfilling in the ultimate sense, " Let there be Light" God will be all in all. May God speed the Eighth and glorious day.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 19, 2016
The Stones of the Jordan

Clyde Finklea shares an insight from Tom Kerry about an overlooked prophecy in Matthew 3:7-9, referring to the stones placed in the Jordan River by the priests in Joshua's time inscribed with the Law of God in some form—the book of Deuteronomy, the Ten Commandments, or perhaps the Blessings and the Curses—which would have resided near Bethabara (meaning, House of Crossing Over or House of Passing Over), the locale in which John baptized. Bethabara would have been the location where the priests carried the Ark of the Covenant across the Jordan River, leading the people into the Promised Land, directly adjacent to the two famous mountains, Ebal and Gerizim, where the Blessings and Curses were recited. Joshua had commanded that twelve stones be brought to construct an altar in the dry Jordan River bed, stones which would serve as a memorial for the twelve tribes of Israel, upon which would be inscribed the words of the law. Bethabara would also have also been the venue John baptized Jesus, providing the means through which those whom God has chosen would become living stones joined to the Corner Stone which the builders mistakenly rejected. We, as God's called-out ones, are the living stones God would rise for Abraham, that is, in fulfilment of His promises to Abraham.

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Sermonette; Oct 5, 2015
Supreme Permanence and Value

Martin Collins, reflecting that precious stones are highlighted in Scripture 26 times, focuses on the stones in the New Jerusalem referenced in Revelation 21:9ff The 12 precious stones radiate pure light. When precious stones are the recipients of polarized light, all colors of the rainbow are generated (anisotrophic) or they go pure black (isotrophic). Jewels in Scripture are symbols of permanence. The Creator of the Holy City has abundant resources. Each tribe of Israel has its own gate constructed of a precious gem. Our offerings must reflect the radiance of Christ. Only God can assess the quality of light in the precious stones He has called.

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CGG Weekly; Apr 24, 2015
What Happened to the Thief on the Cross? (Part One)

David C. Grabbe:  In Luke 23:43, Jesus Christ tells one of the criminals being crucified next to Him, "Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise." ...

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Sermon; Jul 26, 2014
The Epistles of II and III John (Part One)

Martin Collins indicates that, even though II and III John are the shortest books of the Bible, they do contain significant themes, amplifying the contents of I John, emphasizing the fellowship with God. II and III John, addressed to elders in supporting local churches, advocate hospitality to legitimate teachers and forbid supporting false teachers. II John provides tests of life, determining authenticity of genuine believers, as well as advocating faithfulness in large and small responsibilities, including the friends with which one chooses to associate, realizing that true wisdom is the right application of spiritual language. No conflict should ever exist between the spirit and the letter of the Law. The message of II John has special application today, where the church is also besieged by perennial schisms and heresies, not unlike the kind of problems experienced in the Corinthian congregation. Love for the truth automatically leads to love for one another within the congregation. A common commitment to the truth is the foundation of genuine Christian fellowship. In our quest for unity, we can never compromise with the truth. True love between brethren is impossible without an equal love for the truth, leading to a perpetual walking in the light of truth, elevating the Word of God over the traditions of man and every wind of questionable doctrine which inevitably leads to lawlessness. We have the obligation to test everything presented to our minds, examining it against the standard of the Scriptures, holding fast to the truth, filtering out and discarding any toxic prevarications.

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Sermon; May 3, 2014
Psalms: Book Two (Part One)

Richard Ritenbaugh, acknowledging that the Psalms have been divided into five books, suggests that there is methodology in the organization, reminding us of the number of Divine grace, as well as a number of handy organization emphasizing groups of five, including the summary Psalms (Psalms 146-150), the Pentateuch, the Megilloth, and the Israelite's division of the year into five seasons. The Pentecost season generally corresponds to Book II of the Psalms, the Book of Exodus, and the story of Ruth, typifying counting to Pentecost (the 50th day commemorating the harvest), in which wave loaves baked with leaven (a symbol of corruption) would be offered. Themes of the Pentecost season include leaving the corners of the field un-harvested, the trek of the Israelites to Sinai to receive the Law and the Covenant (a marriage covenant occurring on the same day as Pentecost, depicting another marriage covenant), and the giving of the Holy Spirit on the anniversary of the giving of the Law. Exile, leaving, departing, separation, and redemption are also major themes of this season and Book II of the Psalms. The Book of Exodus also provides instructions for construction of the Tabernacle (prefiguring the church and a future nation of priests). The summary Psalm 147 indicates that God gives His Law and Spirit, building up the Heavenly Jerusalem through the redemption of a remnant (the redeemed outcasts transformed through trail and distress into the Israel of God), the Bride of Christ.

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Sermon; Apr 19, 2014
Behold Your King!

Martin Collins, examining the scriptures proclaiming Jesus Christ as King of Kings and Lord of Lords, rehearses the horrible trial and crucifixion of Jesus Christ, a mockery of both Jewish and Roman justice, a trial which acquitted an innocent man, only to have Him executed because of the squeamishness and fearfulness of Pontius Pilate encountering a blood-thirsty mob. Jesus was declared innocent multiple times, including by the thief on the cross, the centurion who speared Him, and others, but Pilate could not muster the courage to acquit Him. He did, however, write a caption above Him in three languages, Hebraistic Aramaic (implying that He was the King over all religious law), Greek (implying He was the King over culture), and Latin (implying He was King over all civil law). Jesus' sinless and faithful life qualifies Him to assume the role of King of Kings , as contrasted by some of the prominent kings of Israel (including Solomon) who seriously fell short of the requirements God established for kings in Deuteronomy 17:17. As an inset in this message, we are reminded that Jesus did not go to Paradise immediately after His death, but instead into the grave. The thief on the cross, as well as the rest of us, will have to wait for Jesus Christ's establishment of His Kingdom before we can join Him, ruling with Him as kings and priests. As aspiring rulers, we dare not compromise with God's Law.

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CGG Weekly; Jun 15, 2012
The Overlooked Work (Part Two)

Waiting is a foundational aspect of faith, hope, and love, and is sometimes one of the hardest works of all. ...

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 14, 2003
Stay in Jerusalem

Charles Whitaker, focusing upon the proclamations of two Gentile kings (Cyrus and Artaxerxes) in the book of Ezra, examines the impact they had on the remnant of Israel- as well as the lessons we may derive from their lack luster behavior. Those who returned to Jerusalem did not completely fulfill their commission, failing to completely rebuild the walls and failing to totally rebuild the temple. These people lacked resolve and stamina. Sadly the re-establishment of the God's law, educational system, and civil system- (a theocracy governed by God's laws) was embarked upon with less than optimal results because they refused to expunge the Babylonian system from their culture and separate themselves from the pagan customs around them- assimilating (through intermarriage) the religious culture around them, including the Sabbath defying business practices, and sports events. The wall serves a symbol of the separation of God's people from pagan culture ' a partition between sin and righteousness ' a special sanctification. Unfortunately the lack-luster effort aborted this sanctification process. We dare not emulate their foolishness.

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Prophecy Watch; June 1998
Who Are the 144,000?

This is a subject that has long been a source of controversy. However, when we let the Bible interpret itself, the answer is plain!

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Prophecy Watch; April 1997
Israel: Future

What is in store for the nations of Israel? Is their future promising or bleak—or both? This article concludes a three-part series on the people of Israel.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jan 5, 1988
Hebrews (Part 13)

John Ritenbaugh examines the three levels of faith exercised by the roll call of the faithful in Hebrews 11: (1) Faith that motivates (2) Faith that provides vision, and (3) Faith that brings understanding- accumulated incrementally by calculating or adding up the evidence God has provided for us. Abraham, the father of the faithful, did not have a 'blind faith,' but it was based upon observation of God's proven track record of faithfulness. Like Abraham, Jacob, Isaac, or Moses, we are also called upon to give up a relatively stable life (the seeming 'rock solid' certainty of world) and embrace the tenuous life of a pilgrim, soberly calculating or adding up the certainty of God's promises- based upon God's proven faithfulness in our life- relying on the motivation, vision, and understanding of an incrementally developed mature faith.


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