Self-Government and Responsibility (Part Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Jacob's Trouble, or the Great Tribulation, comes about because people are not meeting their God-given responsibilities: keeping His Commandments.


Self-Government and Responsibility (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our experiences prepare us to be a better judge or king. Though we may exercise righteous judgment, we dare not pass judgment nor justify sin in ourselves.


Liberalism and the English Riots

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on an article by Max Hastings in the Daily Mail, identifies liberal dogma as a major contributory cause of the disgusting riots in London. Others have blamed the riotous behavior on stodgy old people, race, banks, greedy corporations, Zionist Jews, Satan, and perhaps the decrepit or ineffectual Anglican …


Abdicate

Sermonette by Ryan McClure

In 1936, British King Edward VIII abdicated for the woman he loved. Satan's pride and Adonijah's presumptuousness urged them to leave their ordained positions.


The Handwriting is on the Wall (2008)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this keynote address of the 2008 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh, describing the scene in the parking lot following a university football game, in which garbage, litter, and abandoned automobiles covered the grounds, suggested that this scene provided a snapshot of the moral state of America, displaying the despicable …


Self-Government: Overcoming

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We dare not allow anybody to come between God's direct governance and ourselves. Even God's government will not work unless we voluntarily govern ourselves.


Self-Discipline

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Protestant theology recognizes that Christian self-discipline presents a major logical difficulty in its keystone doctrine of 'by grace alone.'


A Contrast of Kings

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on our future roles as kings and priests, warns us that we currently have no preparation, but God desires that we will be kings and priests. He desires to fill thousands of leadership positions in the Millennium. In the law of first mention, the theme of king is significant, pertaining to realm. …