Basic Doctrines: Going On to Perfection

Bible Study by Staff

Most of our Christian lives will be spent going on to perfection. But what is it? How do we do it? This Bible Study will help explain this broad, yet vital subject.


Growing to Perfection

Article by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker shows that spiritual growth mimics our physical growth to maturity. If we continue in the process, we will "grow into" our potential as God's children.


Perfection...Piece by Piece

'Ready Answer' by Mike Ford

What is perfection? Does God require perfection of us? Mike Ford defines Biblical perfection and shows to what standard God holds us accountable.


Going on to Perfection

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid, reflecting on his skin diving experiences several years ago, recalls that the ocean is always unstable. If we do not latch on to our target in the ocean, it will quickly drift away, very much like the congregation in Hebrews 2:1. Today, we are bombarded by fast moving technology, competing for our attention, causing …


The Unleavened Bread of Perfection

CGG Weekly by Clyde Finklea

Keeping the leaven out is very important in its own right. However, our primary focus should not be on the leavened bread but on the unleavened bread.


Knowing Christ (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, using athletic running metaphors, emphasizes that we, like the Apostle Paul, must discipline ourselves, apply concentrated effort, and run with endurance to attain our reward or office (not to attain salvation, as some anti-nomian teachers have falsely charged). Sanctification is the longest, most difficult, and …


Works of Faith (Part 2)

'Ready Answer' by Staff


What Does God Really Want? (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the atmosphere of disorder which has emerged in the greater church of God, caused by individuals (ministry and lay members alike), obsessed with the urge to change doctrine, convinced that God was too weak to control Herbert W. Armstrong. The unspoken accusation is that God raised up a messenger, …


Keeping God's Standards

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

God's law will be the spiritual weights and measures in the Kingdom, but until then, we must glorify God by keeping these standards as a bright light.


Five Teachings of Grace

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Protestantism unthinkingly presents grace as "free." However, Scripture shows that God expects a great deal of effort from us once we receive it—it is costly.


Philippians (Part 9)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that while Godly righteousness is open ended, allowing room for growth, human righteousness is self-limiting because of its self-centered mindset, smugly satisfied with its accomplishments. The attainment of Godly righteousness demands humility, a readiness to admit shortcomings, a yieldedness to …


Philippians (Part 8)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, pointing out the Apostle Paul's contention that any righteousness or morality attained by our own law keeping falls short of the righteousness required for salvation, asserts that only the righteousness of Christ attained through faith will pass muster. Unlike man's limiting, myopic, self-centered righteousness, …


Hitting the Mark

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Bill Onisick, reflecting upon the Irish Dart competition in which a 9-Darter displays championship, draws a spiritual analogy based on the fact that one definition of sin is "missing the mark," as one of the Greek words for sin, hamartia denotes. Jesus warns us that, unless our righteousness exceeds that of the …


The Covenants, Grace, and Law (Part Twenty-Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The New Covenant, which writes God's law onto the heart, in no way does away with any aspect of the law. Works do not justify us, they sanctify us.


Hebrews (Part 8)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus Christ's priesthood is superior to the Aaronic priesthood because Christ tenure is eternal rather than temporal, guaranteeing both continuity and quality.