The First Commandment

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Idolatry is probably the sin that the Bible most often warns us against. We worship the source of our values and standards, whether the true God or a counterfeit.


The First Commandment: Idolatry

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Idolatry is the most frequently committed sin, seen in five commandments. God challenges us to either defend our body of beliefs or drop them in favor of His.


The Commandments (Part Two)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Idolatry constitutes the fountainhead from which all other sins flow, all of which amplify obsessive self-centeredness and self-indulgence.


You Shall Love Your Neighbor (Part One)

CGG Weekly by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

The problem with the Pharisees is that they never grasped the simplicity of the law, much less the spirit of it, but dissected it to be thought righteous.


Our Mission Possible

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Bill Onisick suggests that if we inculcate the mission statement found in Deuteronomy 6:1-5 (known as the Shema), we will have a high certainty of life and a huge chance at success. If we get this one thing right (loving God with all our heart, soul, and mind) we will succeed at our objectives. Jesus Christ pointed out that the …


Living a Life that Pleases God

Sermonette by Clyde Finklea

Even as Enoch lived a life that pleased God, the Scriptures identify seven qualities that enable us to live a life that pleases God.


More Righteous Than the Pharisees?

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

The Pharisees were in the office or seat of Moses. Jesus taught His followers to follow their words (pertaining to the Law of God), but not their personal examples.


Love Thy Neighbor (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

He who loves God must love his brother, including every fellow human being. Our closeness with God transcends the other human relationships.


As Much as Depends on You

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, observing that despite such inane, politically correct slogans such as "unity through diversity," neither unity nor peace really exists in the world, but conflict has continued to increase. Though we are periodically confronted with conflict, we have a Christian duty to make peace through exercising …


Forms vs. Spirituality (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Love, justice, mercy, and fidelity (the weightier matters of the law) God desires more than meticulous, mechanical religiosity.


Walking With God

CGG Weekly by Clyde Finklea

'Enoch walked with God,' but what does this mean? To walk with God requires these five attributes that we all need to strengthen in ourselves.


Deuteronomy (Part 4) (1994)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must seek God as ardently as we would a physical love relationship, spending quality time with Him. If we make no effort, the relationship cools.


Offerings (Part Four)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


Deuteronomy: What Is God Looking For?

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Deuteronomy constitutes instruction for the Israel of God, serving as a compass and guide, preparing God's people to enter the Kingdom of God.


Being a Christian

Sermon by Clyde Finklea

Micah provides a formula for being a Christian: 1.) Doing justly, 2.) Exercising mercy and 3.) Walking humbly. These demand total commitment, not a pretense.


Deuteronomy and Idolatry

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We are admonished to internalize the book of Deuteronomy in preparation for our future leadership roles.


Keep Yourself From Idols

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

An idol is anything in our lives that occupies the space which should be occupied by God alone, anything having a controlling force in our lives.


The Offerings of Leviticus (Part Three): The Meal Offering

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The meal offering represents the fulfillment of the second great commandment, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself." Here is how to understand this offering.


The Sacrifices of Leviticus (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The meal offering represents the intense self-sacrifice required in service to man. Our service to man must be done for God's sake rather than man's appreciation.


Offerings (Part One)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


The Offerings of Leviticus (Part Four): The Peace Offering

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The peace (or thank) offering was the most commonly given in ancient Israel. It pictures God, the priest, and the offerer in satisfying fellowship.


The Christian and the World (Part Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The best way to attain true wealth and the abundant eternal life is to loosen our grip on worldly rewards and treasures, and single-mindedly follow Christ.