Parable of the Sower

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

God spreads His Word liberally among the world's people. Besides God's direct involvement in converting people, the difference between one growing in it and another "dying on the vine" is the soil in which the Word is planted, explained in Jesus' Parable of the Sower.


Parables of Matthew 13 (Part Two): The Parable of the Sower

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

The first parable of Matthew 13 lays the groundwork (pun intended) for the remainder of the chapter. Martin Collins explains the various soils upon which the seed of the gospel falls, and the reasons why growth—or its lack—results.


Amending the Soil

Sermonette by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, commenting on the dry and hard clay in South Carolina, a real challenge to cultivate, identifies some grounds of comparison Christ cites between ourselves and clay (soil). In the Parable of the Sower, Christ describes 1.0) hard, impenetrable soil of the wayside, vulnerable to birds, symbolizing the devil and …


Weeds!

Article by Mike Ford

Drawing an analogy between kudzu and the thorns in the Parable of the Sower, Mike Ford shows how we have to "weed out" detrimental habits that choke our lives. If we want to produce quality fruit, we must weed the garden!


Many Are Called, But Few Are Chosen (Part Seven)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The letters to the seven churches of Revelation warn of losing our first love, heeding false teachers, compromising God's Truth, and forgetting right doctrine.


Caveats About Self-Examination

Sermon by David F. Maas

David Maas, anticipating the forthcoming Passover, and the stern warning from the apostle Paul that we thoroughly examine ourselves, cautions us to be very careful how we undertake this self-examination. We must realize that (1) taking the Passover in an unworthy manner can result in serious physical or spiritual hazards, (2) …


Continuing on to Completion

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, assuring us that no part of the Christian life is free of dangers, warns us to be continually on guard against the enemy (Satan the devil, coupled with our own carnal human nature), cautioning that we cannot afford to obliviously coast. The only antidote to succumbing to the wiles of the enemy is to persistently …