True Self-Control

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Self-control is the ability to focus our attention so that our decisions will not be directed by wrong thoughts. If we change our thoughts, we change our behavior.


Sanctification, Teens, and Self-Control

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Young people are responsible for the spiritual knowledge that they have learned from their parents, as well as the custodianship of spiritual blessings.


Enduring as a Good Soldier

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, referring to the words of salvation (election, calling, regeneration, conversion, sanctification, and glorification), suggests that we are entering the most difficult time of the sanctification process, a time Jeremiah described as a man in the throes of labor, a time when God's called out ones would be required …


The Five Warnings of Hebrews

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The modern church stands in danger of allowing salvation to slip away. Hebrews gives warnings to help us turn our lives around so we do not fall short.


Maintaining Good Health (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon several abuses of one of God's gifts to mankind — eating and drinking. While drunkenness and gluttony indicate self-centeredness, lack of discipline, often leading to poverty and ill health, moderation in all things is the way to glorify God in our bodies. God's called out ones must exercise …


Are You Dissipating Your Own Energy?

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

We need to be on guard against dissipating our energy, becoming over-immersed in activity and busyness to the point of losing overall effectiveness.


Matthew (Part 10)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


Fathers Provoking Children

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Most families in God's church have a functional father, but even so, extremes of leniency and overbearing strictness do not make an ideal father.


Love's Greatest Challenges

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Laziness and fear are the greatest challenges to love. When Protestant theologians disparage "works," connecting them to salvation rather than sanctification and growth, they encourage spiritual laziness. If we are lazy, we might still be saved, but we will have built nothing to fulfill God's purpose in us. If we …


Who Are We and Where Do We Fit (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God has placed us all in the body where it has pleased Him. We dare not imitate Satan by letting self-centered goals eclipse God's purpose.


How Far Have We Fallen? (Part One)

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, citing Isaiah 5:20-25 and reflecting on the changes that have taken place in our culture for the last 80 years, cautions us that regression in moral turpitude has accelerated rapidly. Because of the rapid information flow, the changes occur faster, and the regressions become the norm, as is seen in the …