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Charity

Go to Bible verses for: Charity

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Sermon; Jun 9, 2018
Themes of Ruth (Part Four): Kindness and Faith

Richard Ritenbaugh, acknowledging that Americans have a reputation for kindness warns that we are likely more and more to see a dark underside of America, where hardness of heart supplants kindness. In this milieu, chesed (covenant loyalty and mercy, or showing loving kindness to the most aggravating sinner) cannot exist. David demonstrated chesed by displaying kindness to Jonathan's son Mephibosheth, in spite of the potential dangers doing so could bring to himself. The greater David, our Savior Jesus Christ, also exhibits chesed, loving us while we were still hostile to Him. Both Ruth and Naomi demonstrated covenant loyalty, remaining loyal to the marriage covenant long after the death of their spouses. Ruth faithfully continued to serve her mother-in-law, at what appeared to be great sacrifice to her own interests. Through her choice to become betrothed to Boaz, declining the attentions of more youthful suitors, she demonstrated a special covenant loyalty for which God blessed her by including her in the genealogy of the Messiah. Like Ruth and like Our Savior Jesus Christ, we must assume the role of a servant, obeying the marching orders of Micah 6:8: Walking humbly, justly, and demonstrating chesed.

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Commentary; Mar 29, 2014
Charity Begins at Home

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the excessive governmental regulations which have grown like a malignant cancer in the last thirty years, observes that Satan favors the concept of tyrannical, centralized government. If God's laws of love were internalized, there would be little need for the kind of control exercised by governmental officials today. Ironically, it is through the appeal to 'charity,' a responsibility demanded to all of us, that government has taken over charitable functions. If Christians had taken care of their families in the first place, despotic governments and confiscatory taxes would have not metastasized to the dangerous, debilitating level they have now become.

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Ready Answer; March 2007
Jumping Into the Shallow Pond (Part Two)

Philosophers and ethicists, steeped in humanism, shoot wide of the truth in answering, 'Who is my neighbor?' Charles Whitaker explains that the Bible reveals the answer to this big moral question, as well as providing sensible guidelines on the finer details of Christian charity.

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Ready Answer; February 2007
Jumping Into the Shallow Pond (Part One)

In an age when globalism is a reality, when immediate contact with far-flung peoples occurs every day, answering "Who is my neighbor?" is a vital necessity. En route to explaining Jesus' reply to the lawyer in Luke 10, Charles Whitaker exposes how today's celebrated thinkers answer this question.

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Sermon; Jul 19, 2003
"If I Have Not Charity"

Richard Ritenbaugh asserts that Christianity has both an inward aspect (building godly character or becoming sanctified) and an outward aspect (doing practical philanthropic good works.) Both aspects are vitally necessary, with righteous character serving as the well - spring or fountainhead for the second (outward) aspect. Godly good works, of necessity, should reflect a great deal of thought and concern, with considerable attention to the long-term consequences of the extended help. Soft-heartedness must not be accompanied by soft-headedness, but must take into account long-term solutions (the ultimate well-being of the recipient of the charity) involving thoughtfulness and common sense, carefully considering God's will in the matter. Good works are the fruit of righteousness, not an end in itself. We need to give according to our abilities, freely, generously, with a view of honoring God.

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Bible Study; July 2003
Parable of the Good Samaritan

Most people understand the basic point of this well-known parable. The whole story describes working compassion as contrasted to selfishness. It also clarifies just who is our neighbor.

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Sermon; Apr 17, 2003
No Real Love Without God

John Reid, contrasting the world's self-serving, lust-driven "way of get" (mistakenly called love) with God's example of sacrifice and way of outgoing concern, concludes that what the world needs now is the agape love modeled by the Father and Jesus Christ. We are called to take on the very nature of God, to put on the love of God that casts out all fear. Our goal is to take on the likeness of Jesus Christ, developing His character, thereby reflecting the true love of God. If we have lost our first love, we need to rekindle it by ardently keeping God's Commandments, demonstrating both love for God (the first four) and love for mankind (the last six). Attaining God's nature and love requires that we keep His commandments. Of all the spiritual gifts we could ever hope to attain, the love of God surpasses all of them. Love is the way God lives throughout eternity.

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CGG Weekly; Jan 24, 2002
Welfare and Christianity

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  It is beyond question that Christians should be compassionate. We are to give to the poor and aid the needy. We are to lend a helping hand to those who have stumbled and bear the burdens of the weak. It is sin to us if we know to do good and fail to do it. But how far does this go? ...

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; July 1998
The Fruit of the Spirit: Kindness

Kindness, the fifth fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5, goes hand-in-hand with love. It is an active expression of love toward God and fellow man. As we come out of this calloused world, we must develop kindness through the power of God's Spirit.

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Bible Study; June 1998
Kindness

The fifth fruit of the Spirit, kindness, reflects God's loving actions toward us. We in turn must learn to bestow kindness on others.

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Article; February 1996
During a Famine, What Is the Work?

God's church faces a time of severe trial, a famine of the Word. What should Christians be doing during such a time? John Reid uses the example of the first-century church to provide an answer.


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