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Garments, Priestly


The Priesthood of God (Part Ten) Conclusion

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

As future priests, we are going to be given rigorous, hands-on jobs to teach people righteousness and holiness, distinguishing between the sacred and profane.

The Priesthood of God (Part Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing Revelation 15:3-4, focuses on God's absolute holiness, demanding total veneration, drawing a clear and logical connection between goodness and holiness. God demands that we align ourselves with His holiness, separating ourselves from. . .

The Priesthood of God (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon I Peter 1:13-16, reiterates that holiness must be an indispensible characteristic of the called-out priesthood. This mandate markedly influences our relationships, making us servants to one another as a band of brothers and s. . .

After the Resurrection

Sermon by Mark Schindler

Mark Schindler, focusing on the events occurring between Christ's resurrection and ascension, offers some speculation as to specific details occurring within this period of time, shedding light on the second part of the Atonement sacrifice. During these ho. . .

The Priesthood of God (Part Eight)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Hebrews 4:1-2 (describing the utter failure and demise of the ancient Israelites, who did not regard God's commandments as a delight), continues elaborating on the qualities (holiness and goodness) necessary for attaining the p. . .

A Time to Tear

Sermon by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker, focusing upon the phrase in Ecclesiastes 3:7 that there is a time to tear [or rend] and a time to sew [or mend], delves into the Middle Eastern cultural practice of tearing garments as an expression of grief or despair. When God became up. . .

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh debunks the foolish notion that it does not matter what we wear if our heart is right on the inside. Our clothing as well as our outward conduct must match what is going on in our inner heart or being. Our clothing, often symbolizing righte. . .

The Day of Atonement and Israel's Future

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The cleansing of Joshua's filthy robes in Zechariah 3 is a future application of the cleansing in Leviticus 16, when Jesus Christ cleanses Israel in the future.

Modesty (Part Two): Put On Righteousness

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The immodesty of current fashion exposes the nakedness of our children as though they were prostitutes. Swimsuits have evolved into 'legalized' nakedness.

God's Warning

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid, reflecting on Christ's admonition to watch, suggests that to watch world events, but to ignore our spiritual progress and overcoming, is a foolish and futile exercise. We need to watch how we conduct ourselves. The oil that the wise and foolish . . .

Suppressed Archaeology (Part Five)

Commentary by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, resuming his exposé of American academics who have deliberately sought to suppress evidence of pre-Columbian migrations of Old World civilizations, including Hebrew, Phoenician, Roman, Arabic, Basque, and Viking cultures, identifies settlem. . .

Psalms: Book Two (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, acknowledging that the Psalms have been divided into five books, suggests that there is methodology in the organization, reminding us of the number of Divine grace, as well as a number of handy organization emphasizing groups of five, i. . .



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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