Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Manners

Go to Bible verses for: Manners

Show more Show less
Commentary; Oct 21, 2017
American Manners?

John Ritenbaugh, citing an article by George Friedman on "Manners and Political Life," describes manners as cultural conventions established to maintain civility and progress. The Ten Commandments are manners set by the Highest Authority to maintain civility and progress in an entire nation. God is the ultimate manner-creator, but conventions established by the rich, athletes, politicians, and entertainers also determine manners. Manners are learned in childhood, shaped, modified, and re-enforced by family standards and expectations. In the current turbulent political climate, the far-left media, collaborating with liberal 'progressives' pushing political correctness, have successfully destroyed the manners and dignity of the nation. This unholy alliance encourages cursing and physical violence because it considers restraint to be hypocritical. In this current milieu, evil is accepted as the norm, while godliness and righteousness are regarded as evil. America's manners are figuratively in the manure pile. God's called-out ones must emulate Jesus Christ's manners rather than fall into the profound lack of manners demonstrated by Satan's children.

Show more Show less
Ready Answer; July 2014
Courtesy

These days, it seems, everyone demands respect but few are willing to grant it to others. It is a rare event and often worthy of note when someone gives up his seat to a woman or elderly person or when a child responds with proper deference. Mike Ford analyzes this international problem, zeroing in on the Bible's injunctions on the subject.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Jun 28, 2014
Courtesy

Mike Ford, suggesting that our human nature coaxes us to behave rudely, such as riding other people's bumpers if they are driving too slowly, or slowing to a snail's pace if other people tailgate us, affirms that rudeness seems to be a primary carnal human trait. American schools seem to re-enforce this attribute by teaching young people that everything revolves around them. Rudeness is an international aberration; the Communist Chinese have made teaching courtesy a top priority in preparation for high-level conferences. The German philosopher Schopenhauer stated that it was wise to be courteous and stupid to be rude, similar to setting ones house on fire. Youth are no longer taught to be respectful of older people or to look an adult in the eye. God's word has much to say about politeness and rudeness. A Christian who is taught to put others first will have little difficulty being courteous.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Oct 26, 2012
Recovering Civility

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  A session of the British Parliament, particularly the House of Commons, can be almost hilarious. Speakers there are frequently interrupted with hissing, booing, and other forms of caustic disagreement ...

Show more Show less
Sermon; Sep 30, 2006
Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 3)

Martin Collins focuses upon a list of lapses in etiquette within society and the church, many occurring because of faulty child rearing practices. Children‚s games often imitate violence and murder as well as disrespect for the elderly. The Old Testament makes disrespect for parents a capital offense. Parents sometimes forget that their offspring become mirror images of their own behavior, so they ought to instill in children good manners by guiding them toward positive habits. Parents are obligated to teach God‚s laws to their children. According to Emily Post, good manners are to the family what good morals are to society. Karen Santorum in her book Everyday Graces: A Child's Book of Good Manners urges that parents seize their obligation to cultivate good manners in their children. Because the Church of God is the Kingdom of God in embryo, we are obligated to persevere in a life of holiness.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Aug 12, 2006
Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 1)

Martin Collins asks what we can do to improve our manners or etiquette. Our manners express our personality, especially as they portray humility, courtesy, or gentleness. The apostle Paul indicts all of us as lacking in courtesy before we were called. Now we must display the work of salvation, involving the etiquette and courtesy shown in the behavior of our Savior. Before our calling we did not possess these traits. Afterward, we go through a process of sanctification to develop the fruit of God's Holy Spirit and go on to perfection. Good manners, etiquette, and character may be improved by 1) trying to understand the other person's point of view, 2) paying attention in the little things, 3) making sure we keep our commitments, 4) clarifying what our expectations are, 5) always showing personal integrity, 6) apologizing for failing to keep our word or letting another person down, 7) and showing unconditional love.

Show more Show less
Sermon; May 17, 1997
Civility and Courtesy

Focusing upon the rising tide of societal incivility, Richard Ritenbaugh warns that discourtesy and ugly in-your-face attitudes (fruits of the flesh) have also manifested themselves in the greater church of God. These disgusting works of the flesh (Galatians 5:19-21) are exactly the opposite of what God expects of us- the opposite of Agape love. Good manners (minor morals or the small change of virtue) are the fundamentals of love for others and love for God. Unfortunately, good manners and courtesy do not come naturally, but have to be learned and continually practiced. The common denominator of etiquette is to esteem others more and making ourselves less. When we show courtesy to others, we imitate God.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Manners



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page