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God's Work

Go to Bible verses for: God's Work

God's Workmanship (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh stresses that salvation is an entire creative process undertaken by God to justify, sanctify, and glorify a called out body of individuals. Ephesians 2:8 uses the perfect tense 'saved,' indicating an action started in the past and continuin. . .

What Is the Work of God Now? (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The preaching the gospel to the world is at best the beginning of a complex process of creating disciples through steady feeding and encouragement to overcome.

What Is the Church's Work Today (Part 1)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh provides the rationale of this phase of the church's work- what and why the Church of the Great God is doing what it is doing. In this time of scattering, God is testing our loyalty to Him, correcting deficiencies that will keep us out of H. . .

God's Rest (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Using II Corinthians 5:14-17 as a foundation, John Ritenbaugh affirms that after the initiation of the conversion process, the hostility that formerly existed between God and us has been removed, leading to a state of peace and rest. Although we often spea. . .

A View of the Work

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

David Grabbe, pointing out that not all of God's servants are given the same marching orders (planting, watering, etc) maintains that planting seed (preaching the Gospel to the world) is only the beginning of the phase. Our function is not and has never be. . .

What Is the Church's Work Today (Part 2)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the easiest part of God's work is the preaching the Gospel to the world- a task mechanically carried out as the church deteriorated from within. Much more demanding is the feeding of the flock, producing the kind of faith an. . .

Is the Christian Required To Do Works? (Part Five)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus Christ came to this earth with a message of salvation, which the Bible calls 'the gospel of the Kingdom of God.' John Ritenbaugh, in setting up the final article in the series, describes just what Christ's gospel is and its relationship to Christian . . .

God Our Provider

Article by Charles Whitaker

The story of building the Tabernacle serves as an encouraging example for us today as we colaborate with God in building His church. God will provide what we need to finish the job to His specifications!

Love and Works

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Countering the Protestant red-herring argument, "You cannot earn salvation by works," John Ritenbaugh stresses that works certainly are not "done away" but that God expects works from all those He has called. We show our faithfulness an. . .

God's Perseverance With His Saints (Part Three)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, concluding his series "God's Perseverance with the Saints," focuses on Christ's desire that all His disciples have unity and love. The unity He appeals for is not organizational unity, but unity within the divine nature, exampled . . .

How Much Money Does God Need?

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Men discovered long ago that religion can be big business. ...

Snapshots (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Time-lapse cinematography—such as a five-minute video clip composed of 100,000 slightly different pictures—is a useful way of understanding how each moment of our lives relates to the overall progression. So even though a present "snapshot" of . . .

The Sabbath: Creation

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, acknowledging that only fools are blind to the marvels of Creation, observes that even empirical science has substantiated the need for six factors to support life: 1) crust, 2.) temperature, 3.) moon, 4.) star with a stable energy sour. . .

The Impossible Metric

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Unlike God, "who inhabits eternity" (Isaiah 57:15), we mortals have a limited existence. Because of our finite time, we tend to view things through the lens of immediacy. ...

Pentecost - The Beginning - All in All

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Mark Schindler

Mark Schindler, focusing on the seventh day, the last great day of Jesus' final Feast of Tabernacles, admonishes us to look beyond the significance of our own calling, realizing that the sacrifice of Christ was intended for all men with the hope that they . . .

Snapshots (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

As the book of Hebrews ends, the author—likely Paul—pens this benediction: "Now may the God of peace who brought up our Lord Jesus from the dead, that great Shepherd of the sheep, ..."

Leadership and the Covenants (Part Fourteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting upon the episode of God's rescuing of Noah and his family from the devastating flood, marvels about the perennial biblical patterns that never change, serving as an unambiguous teaching device. That rescue indicates God has neve. . .

Our Awesome Destiny (1993)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on man's ultimate destiny to have dominion over the entire universe, admonishes that preparation for this awesome responsibility requires faithful stewardship over the things God has entrusted to us (our bodies, families, posses. . .

'This Gospel of the Kingdom Shall Be Preached'

'Prophecy Watch' by David C. Grabbe

Most long-time members of the church of God have Matthew 24:14 indeliably etched on their memories: "This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world. . . ." David Grabbe contends that many have failed to understand this verse as a prophecy, a. . .

Staying With the Puck

Article by Charles Whitaker

A hockey puck changes direction almost constantly, and a hockey player has to move with it. Charles Whitaker uses this analogy to explain how we must follow God when He changes the focus of His work.

Eternal Security (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh claims that the harshest criticism we receive is for our position opposing the doctrine of eternal security, having the audacity to suggest that works are required for salvation. I Timothy 1:8 indicates that the Law is good only if we use i. . .

Eternal Security (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that God is a working God, creating holy, righteous, divine character with the goal of recreating man in His image. From the time of our justification until our glorification in God's Kingdom, it almost seems 'downhill,' with san. . .

Sovereignty, Election, and Grace (Part 7)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh asserts that when God created Adam, He prepared only a foundation for mankind's eventual spiritual creation undertaken by the Second Adam. Spiritual creation requires much intense pressure and continual testing to determine character. Jesus. . .

His Eye is On the Sparrow (Part One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on three scriptures, Psalm 11:3-5, Luke 12:7, and Philippians 4:19, reflects on a frightening earthquake in 1971, in which he realized that he was in no way in control of the alarming situation, a relentless shaking that threatene. . .

Why Be Industrious?

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, asserting that God is a Creator who enjoys work and places a high value on it, urges us, those created in God's image, to embrace the work ethic and to diligently inculcate it into our children. God placed Adam and Eve in the Garden of Ede. . .


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