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In Need of Nothing

Go to Bible verses about In Need of Nothing

'He Who Has an Ear, Let Him Hear . . .'

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

A man with myopic judgment will take the good times he has as evidence of God's pleasure, and conclude that the bad times must be caused by Satan's persecution.

Asa's Laodiceean Attitude

Sermonette by Ted E. Bowling

Ted Bowling, reminding us that King Asa of Judah started his reign trusting in God's intervention and providence, shows that he finished his course weak and compromised, in much the same condition as Christ describes the Laodicean congregation in Revelatio. . .

Carelessness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Carelessness, indicative of not thinking, when reinforced or carried on into life, can be lethal or irreparable. Undervaluing our way leads to a careless lifestyle.

What Does God Really Want? (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, using the term "malignant narcissism" (from M. Scott Peck's book "People Of The Lie") to describe the blind Laodicean pride which denies our inherent sinfulness and imperfection by means of clever self-decptive quibblin. . .

Letters to Seven Churches (Part Eleven): Laodicea

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Laodiceans fail to reciprocate Christ's love for them. The comfort of prosperity blinded them to their spiritual condition, especially their need for Christ.

Christian Zeal

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the famous "Man in the Arena" speech of Theodore Roosevelt, observed that Roosevelt lived his life with vitality and energy. Whether hunting wild game or entertaining at an embassy party, he conducted his behavio. . .

What Does God Really Want? (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh emphasizes that commandment breaking is what has scatterred the greater church of God. We have allowed the self-assured Laodicean mindset (with its ignorance and spiritual blindness) to deter us from overcoming and law keeping. In the parab. . .

Be There Next Year

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Members of God's church usually come home from the Feast of Tabernacles with renewed spiritual vigor. Yet, we are painfully aware that some fall away each year. John Ritenbaugh shows that we must actively seek God and His righteousness to ensure that we wi. . .

What's So Bad About Babylon? (1997)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Using the lesson of the Tower of Babel and the Babylonic system, John Ritenbaugh asserts that mankind must stop trusting in its towers—anything that we place our trust in apart from Almighty God (wealth, status, achievement, military prowess, scienti. . .

Colossian Law-Keeping

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Nominal Christendom cannot see God's law even though it is in plain sight. In Colossians, Paul reiterates or alludes to all but one of the Ten Commandments.

Considering the Day of the Lord

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

David Grabbe warns us that the Day of the Lord will be a fearful time of judgement, darkness, and horror. The Scriptures provide no grounds for anyone to assume that God is on his side during this time; misguided self-assurance is the sole basis for the pr. . .

Laodiceanism and Being There Next Year

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our biggest danger at this time is to be lured into spiritual drunkenness by the pagan Babylonian system. Our God is not what we say we worship but whom we serve.

New Covenant Priesthood (Part 8)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh cautions that pride represents arrogating to self something that has been given to us. God gives gifts. Others invest in us. We presumptuously take the credit. Wealth, whether measured in dollars, knowledge, abilities, or spiritual gifts do. . .

Living By Faith: God's Justice

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In order to live by faith, we must understand God's sovereignty, God's character, and God's justice, realizing that we do not see the entire picture.

New Covenant Priesthood (Part 6)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh teaches that we must have both perseverance and humility in prayer in order to keep our vision sharp and clear. Pride leads people to justify sins such as lying, fornication, adultery, and stealing. Without humility, the doorway to acceptan. . .

Poor in Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Being poor in spirit is a foundational spiritual state for qualifying for God's Kingdom. Poor in spirit describes being acutely aware of one's dependency.


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The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

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