Leadership and the Covenants (Part Thirteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh observes that, in every biblical covenant, God gives responsibilities in order to be in alignment with Him. If we fail to meet the responsibilities He has given to us, God will penalize us. Every covenant we find in Scripture outlines promises, responsibilities, and penalties. As members of the Body of Christ, we …


Deuteronomy (Part 1)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Deuteronomy is the heartbeat of the Old Testament and the constitution of Israel. It is a condensed form of the entire Bible, quoted 195 times in the New Testament.


Examples of Divine Justice

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Nadab and Abihu, Ananias and Sapphira, and Uzzah, all aware of the penalties for their actions, rebelled against God's clear and unambiguous instructions.


Deuteronomy (Part 1) (1994)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Deuteronomy could be considered the New Testament of the Old Testament, serving as a commentary on the Ten Commandments. It gives vision for critical times.


Bezaleel of the House of Judah

Sermonette by Ted E. Bowling

Ted Bowling explores the how's and why's of Bezaleel's special calling as chief-craftsman of the Tabernacle. After 400 years of affliction, God called Israel into a special covenant, giving Moses the details blueprints of the tabernacle . God's expectation was that the tabernacle be perfect. Bezaleel had honed his skills in the …


Approaching God Through Christ (Part Six)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on our olfactory nerves, suggests that categorizing smells seems very imprecise, forcing us to describe them with analogies to something else. Surprisingly, our sense of smell comprises 85% of our taste. Actually humans have been known to detect 10,000 different odors or aromas, but dogs have 1,000 …


Deuteronomy Opening

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Deuteronomy 29:29 which teaches that the secret things belong to God, but that God reveals things needful to those He has called, suggests that this principle resonated throughout the entirety of Scripture. Clearly, God's purpose for mankind for the most part is a mystery, and has been revealed only …


The Beatitudes, Part 5: Blessed Are the Merciful

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Mercy is a virtue that has gone out of vogue, though it is sometimes admired. Jesus, however, places it among the most vital His followers should possess.


The Glory of God (Part 1): The Shekinah

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Shekinah, the pillar of cloud and fire, depicts God's visible presence and protection. Yet His glory is manifested in many other ways as well.


Lamentations (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, while acknowledging that technology has given modern culture some marked advantages over ancient societies, laments that the fields of psychology (with its propensity to deny sin) and mental health have not kept up with advances in the "hard" sciences. Instead of resolving basic interior problems, modern …


Presumption and Divine Justice (Part Two)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The Bible reveals a definite pattern of God's displeasure with resumption. God's justice always aligns with His righteousness; we should be grateful for His mercy.


Eden, The Garden, and The Two Trees (Part Three)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus' crucifixion took place outside the camp of Israel, just outside the border of the Garden of Eden, the general area where the Miphkad Altar stood.


Where God Places His Name (Part One)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The re-establishment of Jerusalem as the world capitol demonstrates that even when God is angry, He still restores His people.


Hebrews (Part 10)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that everything about the Priesthood of Jesus Christ is superior to that of the Levitical system, which was only intended to serve as a type (a forerunner, shadow, or symbol) of the access to God that Jesus would later fulfill. As splendid as it was, there was neither provision for the forgiveness of …