Do We Truly Honor God in Our Actions?

Sermon by Kim Myers

We've all read the verses that state that the Word of God is the Bread of Life, but do we consistently practice what it teaches, and thus honor God?


Honoring God the Father

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Father's Day may have originated when the Roman Catholic Church set aside March 19 to honor fatherhood.


What's in a Name Anyway?

Article by David F. Maas

Names not only identify but they also arouse associations. Biblically, a person's name held his reputation, a thing to be guarded and enhanced.


The Fear of God (Part One)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must have established some relationship with God before we can rightly fear Him. A holy fear is the key to unlocking the treasuries of salvation and wisdom.


The Glory of God (Part 4): Glorifying God

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh insists that a raw display of emotion and exuberance does not necessarily glorify God. What we do to glorify God will reflect just how highly we esteem Him. Because God has redeemed us (purchasing us with an awesome price), we must become living sacrifices, no longer joined with the world—a condition …


Privileges of the Family of God

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

It is impossible to be a Christian without being a child of God. When we are in God's family, we have distinct privileges.


The Third Commandment

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

The third commandment, contemplating God's name, may be the most misunderstood of all. This commandment covers the quality of our worship.


The Third Commandment

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Many think the Third Commandment merely prohibits profane speech. In reality, it regulates the purity and quality of our worship of the great God.


The Third Commandment (1997)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Many think the third commandment deals only with euphemisms and swearing, but it goes much deeper. It regulates the quality of our worship and glorifying God.


The Third Commandment: Idolatry

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In the the Third Commandment, God's name describes His character, attributes, and nature. If we bear God's name, we must reflect His image and His character.


Holiness (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

To appropriate the name of God means to represent His attributes, character and nature. Our behavior must imitate Christ just as Christ revealed God the Father.


The Fourth Commandment (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Sabbath is a special creation, a very specific period of holy time given to all of mankind, reminding us that God created and is continuing to create.


Matthew (Part 27)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh picks up with the account of Jesus triumphal entry into Jerusalem shortly before His crucifixion, an event which fulfilled prophecies and significantly dramatized Jesus Christ's messiahship. The crowds welcoming Jesus, while looking for a political or military hero, were actually choosing the sacrificial Paschal …


Teach Us To Pray! (Part Two)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, focusing on John the Baptist's proclivity to pray, as well as Jesus Christ's continuous practice of praying, cautions us that prayer should be a major practice in our life. Our petitions should center upon God's purpose for His creation and His purposes for us. Prayer should bring us into contact with God's …


How to Know We Love Christ

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We cannot become weary of well-doing, allowing our first love to deteriorate, looking to the world for satisfaction. Here are 8 tests of our love for Christ.


Keeping Love Alive (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

If we love another person, we like to think about him/her, to hear about him/her, please him/her, and we are jealous about his/her reputation and honor.


Power

Article by David C. Grabbe

The concept of power brings many different ideas to mind, any and all of which may certainly be valid. David Grabbe, however, concentrates on the 'little strength' of the church of the Philadelphians, suggesting that Christ commends them for being 'faithful in little' and will reward them with much.