Taking God's Name in Vain

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

God's prohibition against taking His name in vain covers a broad array of words and behaviors that reflect negatively upon Him.


Where God Places His Name (Part Two)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Because we would die from exposure to God's glory, the name of God, reflecting His characteristics, is the only way we can approach God.


Extremes of Idolatry: Graven Images and Sacred Names

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Some stretch the second commandment to condemn the use of all paintings, photographs, and sculptures. Others claim only Hebrew names for God can be used.


Principled Living (Part Five): Witnessing of God

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Our best witness is often through our unspoken behavior; what we do speaks volumes. God gives us a charge to bear His name with dignity in all our actions.


The Third Commandment

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

The third commandment, contemplating God's name, may be the most misunderstood of all. This commandment covers the quality of our worship.


The Third Commandment

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Many think the Third Commandment merely prohibits profane speech. In reality, it regulates the purity and quality of our worship of the great God.


The Third Commandment (1997)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Many think the third commandment deals only with euphemisms and swearing, but it goes much deeper. It regulates the quality of our worship and glorifying God.


The Commandments (Part Four)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

The prohibition against taking God's name in vain is the least understood commandment. When we bear God's name, we are to bear His character and nature.


The Third Commandment: Idolatry

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In the the Third Commandment, God's name describes His character, attributes, and nature. If we bear God's name, we must reflect His image and His character.


Holiness (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

To appropriate the name of God means to represent His attributes, character and nature. Our behavior must imitate Christ just as Christ revealed God the Father.


Swear Not!

'Ready Answer' by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

The New Testament strictly forbids oaths of any kind, as our word should always be honest and trustworthy.


Profanity (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Profane living is equally, if not more significant, than profane words or speech. W bear the name of God; how we act and behave reflects on God.


The Conquering Offensive!

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Our Christian warfare cannot merely consist in maintaining a defensive holding pattern, but instead we must go on the conquering offensive, using the sword.


Pure Language Restored

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, observing that language contains energy, expresses chagrin that advertisements from major corporations seem to be descending to the lowest common denominator. Today we live in a country that praises impulse over restraint, law breaking over law keeping, and foolishness over wisdom. Politically correct language …


Contentment

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid observes that many people live in a state of discontent. Ironically, what they set their hearts upon (wealth, power, influence) often displaces the love for family and a relationship with God. True riches consist of godly character coupled with contentment- a by-product of obedience. Contentment (an inner quality) does …


Vanity (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Vanity has many nuances, including transitoriness, futility, profitlessness, confusion, falseness, conceit, vainglory, denial, and idolatry.


Matthew (Part Seven)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus, showing the spirit of the law, warns against rash divorces, taking oaths, invoking God's name frivolously, realizing that a covenant is binding.