Leavening, The Types

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh declares that the holy days are reliable, effective, multifaceted teaching tools, emphasizing spaced repetition to reinforce our faulty memories and drive the lesson deep into our thinking. The most effective learning involves drills or exercises, inscribing the lessons on our mind (Deuteronomy 16:3). Memory is …


Grace, Unleavened Bread, and the Holy Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We eat unleavened bread because of what God has done, not what we have done. Eating unleavened bread symbolizes following God and displacing sin.


Unleavened Bread and the Holy Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Egypt is not directly a symbol of sin, but instead the world. The Days of Unleavened Bread symbolize what God did for us, not what we did by our own power.


Unleavened Bread and Pentecost

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Unleavened bread serves as a memorial of God's deliverance from the bondage of sin. We must realize that our part of the salvation process is to follow God.


Stuff

Sermonette by Mike Ford

Mike Ford, acknowledging that many of us are now in a de-leavening mode, suggests that getting rid of accumulated clutter is a positive goal as we simplify our lives in our preparation of extracting ourselves from the world and following God. Spring cleaning is a custom largely connected to Israelitish nations. Everybody has the …


James and Unleavened Bread (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The book of James applies to us after the sanctification process has begun. The most effective way of eliminating sin is to do righteousness.


Repentance and Righteousness (Part 1)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Nothing happens in our lives (including repentance) until God initiates it. A change of heart, by God's Holy Spirit, results in a total change of direction.


Communication and Coming Out of Babylon (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God commands us to come out of Babylon, giving us spiritual resources to do so, including faith, vision, hope, and love. These come through knowing Him.


A Simple Recap

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Most of the attrition from the truth stems from losing interest. Drifting away is rarely intentional, but the result of choosing to live carnally.


Knowing Christ (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, using athletic running metaphors, emphasizes that we, like the Apostle Paul, must discipline ourselves, apply concentrated effort, and run with endurance to attain our reward or office (not to attain salvation, as some anti-nomian teachers have falsely charged). Sanctification is the longest, most difficult, and …


John (Part 20)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Just as a seed must die to itself in order to bear fruit, we also must sacrifice our lives, submitting unconditionally to God's to bear abundant fruit.


Our Trusted Source of Truth (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The veracity of the Scriptures is something we can take to the bank, in essence our only protection against the torrent of deception we face today.


The Covenants, Grace, and Law (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Justification does not 'do away' with the law; it brings us into alignment with it, imputing the righteousness of Christ and giving access to God for sanctification.