American Manners?

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, citing an article by George Friedman on "Manners and Political Life," describes manners as cultural conventions established to maintain civility and progress. The Ten Commandments are manners set by the Highest Authority to maintain civility and progress in an entire nation. God is the ultimate manner-creator, …


Courtesy

'Ready Answer' by Mike Ford (1955-2021)

These days, everyone demands respect but few are willing to grant it. It is a rare event when someone gives up his seat or when a child shows deference.


Courtesy

Sermonette by Mike Ford (1955-2021)

Mike Ford, suggesting that our human nature coaxes us to behave rudely, such as riding other people's bumpers if they are driving too slowly, or slowing to a snail's pace if other people tailgate us, affirms that rudeness seems to be a primary carnal human trait. American schools seem to re-enforce this attribute by teaching …


Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 2)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Good manners are not just an accomplishment, but a duty that everyone must practice in order for society to move smoothly.


Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 1)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Our manners express our personality, especially as they portray humility, courtesy, or gentleness, and are improved as we make use of God's Spirit.


Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 3)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Parents are obligated to teach God's laws to their children. According to Emily Post, good manners are to the family what good morals are to society.


Recovering Civility

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

We must ask ourselves if we have allowed fleshly works to creep into our lives. A little civility could go a long way in restoring unity among God's people.


Civility and Courtesy

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Societal incivility, discourtesy, and in-your-face attitudes (works of the flesh) have manifested themselves in the church of God, but contradict agape.


Profanity (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Christ's blood makes us holy; we are a new creation, having an intimate relationship with God. We need to change our behavior to reflect this new status.