Death Is Not the End (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Jesus Christ's approach to death should guide our view of death. He considered His death a work of God, not to be regarded with fear or hostility.


Death Is Not the End (Part Four)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

While various religions and some philosophies suggest an afterlife of some sort, the fear of the unknown transforms death into a foreboding Grim Reaper.


Death Is Not the End (Part One)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

All men have been subject to the fear of death, and it is something that we have to strive to overcome. But Christians have been freed in order to fear God.


Death Is Not the End (Part Seven)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

There is life after death; there is an age to come in which all who have not been called to salvation will be raised to new life to hear what God offers.


Christ's Death and the Immortality of the Soul

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The dangerous false belief of inherent immortal life has led to an acceleration of sin and the danger of eternal oblivion. Only God can give eternal life.


How Did They Overcome? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The blood of the Lamb grants us eternal life, as well as entrance to the Holy of Holies, enabling us to come before the throne of the Most High God.


The Resurrection: A Central Pillar

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Christ's resurrection is of paramount importance to us, because Jesus alone has the keys to our own resurrection and eternal life as firstfruits.


Disproving Hell

Sermon/Bible Study by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Most of Protestant and Catholic theology is immersed in pagan concepts of hell, reinforced by Dante's Inferno. Here is what the Bible says, without tradition.


John (Part Eighteen)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Trust in God's ability to resurrect can neutralize the most basic debilitating fear—the fear of death. Christ assures us that death is not the end.


Trumpets and Hope

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Our hope is founded on Jesus rising from the dead. If there is no resurrection, our faith is worthless; if Christ did not rise, we are still under condemnation.


He Lives, We Live

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Redemption is useless to mortal beings without God's gift of eternal life (I Corinthians 15:19), which God made possible through Christ's resurrection.


Back to Life (Part One)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Sickness and hardship should not erode our faith in God's ultimately favorable purpose for us. A current trial may serve as a witness for the good of others.


The Greatness of God's Power

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Paul emphasized the power of God living in us through the Holy Spirit to enable us to develop into His family. Through God's power, we will triumph over death.


Letters to Seven Churches (Part Three): Smyrna

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Christ prepared the members of Smyrna for martyrdom, promising them eternal glory for enduring a relatively short time, looking at things from a hopeful perspective.


Psalms: Book Four: All His Benefits

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

All that we have has come from others, especially God. The Day of Atonement points out how needy and dependent on God we are; fasting shows our frailty.


Assurance (Part One): Self Examination

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Salvation is an ongoing work of God, obligating us to walk in the Spirit. If we do, we will be not captivated by the lusts of the flesh.


The Gift of Eternal Life

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The difference between living forever and eternal life is that longevity does not equate to quality of life. Living forever while enduring pain lacks appeal.


Snapshots (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Among the greatest challenges we face is not to let a bad snapshot—or even a whole progression of them—convince us that the journey is not worth continuing.


Some Thoughts on Healing

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The typical, secular individual would call healing through faith in God 'superstition.' At best, they would consider it a placebo or mind over matter.