Are We Laodiceans?

CGG Weekly by Pat Higgins

At day's end, ask how much time we spent communicating with God and Christ and how much time They were in none of our thoughts (Psalm 10:4).


'He Who Has an Ear, Let Him Hear . . .'

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

A man with myopic judgment will take the good times he has as evidence of God's pleasure, and conclude that the bad times must be caused by Satan's persecution.


Asa's Laodicean Attitude

Sermonette by Ted E. Bowling

King Asa started his reign trusting in God's intervention and providence, but like the Laodiceans, he finished his course weak and compromised. Here's why.


Carelessness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Carelessness, indicative of not thinking, when reinforced or carried on into life, can be lethal or irreparable. Undervaluing our way leads to a careless lifestyle.


What Does God Really Want? (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Good Samaritan parable teaches that unless one practices doing good rather than just knowing good, his faith will be severely compromised.


Letters to Seven Churches (Part Eleven): Laodicea

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Laodiceans fail to reciprocate Christ's love for them. The comfort of prosperity blinded them to their spiritual condition, especially their need for Christ.


Considering the Day of the Lord

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The ancient Israelites smugly believed that God was on their side, and that because He had not yet responded to their sins, they would be victorious.


Christian Zeal

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Zeal has been discredited as the tool of the charlatan, but Christians must develop passion and zeal for the Christian way of life and the Kingdom of God.


What Does God Really Want? (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

If we want to be like our Savior, then we will live the way He lived, keeping God's commandments — which exemplify the highest form of love.


Be There Next Year

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Members of God's church usually come home from the Feast of Tabernacles with renewed strength. Yet, some fall away each year. Here's how to stay the course.


What's So Bad About Babylon? (1997)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Babylon constitutes the fountainhead of instruction that, like strong drink, impairs the ability to function properly while creating the illusion of ability.


Do You Desire the Day of the Lord?

'Prophecy Watch' by David C. Grabbe

Amos describes the Israelites as proud and secure in their special relationship with God, while God castigates them for presuming He approved of them.


Laodiceanism and Being There Next Year

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our biggest danger at this time is to be lured into spiritual drunkenness by the pagan Babylonian system. Our God is not what we say we worship but whom we serve.


New Covenant Priesthood (Part Eight)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Pride leads to destruction, tricking us into thinking we deserve better than we have. Paradoxically, pride is a mark of inferiority, causing overcompensation.


Colossian Law-Keeping

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Nominal Christendom cannot see God's law even though it is in plain sight. In Colossians, Paul reiterates or alludes to all but one of the Ten Commandments.


The Colossian Heresy and Laodiceanism

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Colossae and Laodicea were susceptible to fast-talking teachers, whose plausible words eroded the true Gospel in favor of pagan thought and practice.


New Covenant Priesthood (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must have both perseverance and humility in prayer to keep our vision sharp and clear. Without humility, the doorway to acceptance by God is closed.


Poor in Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Being poor in spirit is a foundational spiritual state for qualifying for God's Kingdom. Poor in spirit describes being acutely aware of one's dependency.