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Jesus Christ as the Bread of Life

Go to Bible verses for: Jesus Christ as the Bread of Life

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Sermon; Sep 1, 2018
Joseph's Extraordinary Example

Kim Myers, acknowledging that Joseph was an extraordinary type of Jesus Christ, itemizes 16 startling parallels which God purposefully foreordained. (1) The fathers of Jesus and Joseph intensely loved their sons. (2) Their brothers hated both of them. (3) Their fathers sent both of them to their brothers. (4) Both went into the earth and returned. (5) Both lost their tunics. (6) Both Jesus and Joseph lived in Egypt for a while. (7) Their enemies sold both of them for silver. (8) Both Jesus and Joseph were servants. (9) Both overcame temptation. (10) Both suffered at the hands of false witnesses. (11) Both received punishment in the presence of two others. (12) God exalted both to the point that they became ruler's "right hand" men. (13) Both commenced their salvific work at the age of 30. (14) Both provided a lifesaving bread. (15) The brothers of both Jesus and Joseph failed to recognize them for who there were. (16) Both Jesus and Joseph provided salvation. As Jesus and Joseph willingly forgave the faults of their misguided brothers, God commissions us to forgive those who have sinned against us.

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Sermon; Apr 17, 2017
Remaining Unleavened

Richard Ritenbaugh reflects on the second law of thermodynamics which, emphasizes that, as energy is transformed to other forms, it degenerates into a more disordered state, wearing down into entropy, chaos and disorder—exactly the opposite of the Spiritual creation which transforms us into a more perfect state. As God transforms our mind with the change-agent of His Holy Spirit, it becomes completely renewed and reprogrammed into something everlasting, something God-like, learning to think as God thinks. The Feast of Unleavened Bread provides a formula as to how this process works, putting sin (typified as leaven) out and ingesting righteousness and purity (typified as unleavened bread) in its place. We are to demonstrate righteous behavior in our hands by our deeds and behavior and in our foreheads by our thoughts. Jesus Christ is the Living Bread that we must ingest daily by reading His word and imitating His behavior. As we ingest the Living Bread, we shun worldly behavior and conform to Christ's character. Only when we are conformed to the image of Christ, loving righteousness and hating lawlessness, are we acceptable to our Heavenly Father. As we are progressing through the sanctification process, our carnal natures must become completely displaced by God's Holy Spirit, motivating us to refrain from causing offense, but freely forgiving others as God has forgiven us.

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Sermonette; Apr 23, 2016
The Reason for Unleavened Bread

David Grabbe reminds us that the Days of Unleavened Bread signify far more than the avoidance of leavened bread or putting out leaven, a symbol of malice or hypocrisy, and that our focus needs to be on God's management of the process. Israel did not come out of Egypt on their own power, but was delivered only by God's intervention. We have a part in the process to consume unleavened bread, symbolically living a life of sincerity and truth. As we were released from bondage, we attained a new master and a new lease on life. We have an obligation to feast on this unleavened bread throughout our entire life, ingesting the word and instruction of God, which constitutes our spiritual food. Unless we eat the Bread of Life continually, and unless God's Spirit resides in us, we will die. Unless we are metaphorically attached to the vine, we cannot bear fruit. The spiritual strength we receive is the result of eating the bread of life. Unless we have God's Spirit, we will never completely control our human spirit. God gives us the power to bear spiritual fruits such as patience and self-control.

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Sermonette; Apr 16, 2016
Everlasting Covenant of Blood

Ronny Graham, reflecting on the oft-quoted aphorism, "Blood is thicker than water," suggests that in western culture, people understood this to mean that ties to the family come first before any other alliances. Another proverb or aphorism, "The blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb," appears to carry just the opposite meaning. Quite possibly, the origin of this saying originated in the Bible, describing the sealing of a covenant. Within the body, blood is the sustainer and purveyor of life, carrying needed oxygen to the extremities and removing waste products. The circulatory system is the largest organ in the body. Blood is equated with life throughout the Bible. Drinking of blood was expressly and unequivocally forbidden by God. Because of its inextricable connection to life, the sprinkling of blood on the altar by the high priest once a year symbolized atonement. Countless animal lives were sacrificed for this somber purpose. God is mindful of life, knowing where every drop of blood has fallen. Christ, speaking to an audience familiar with the proscriptions on drinking blood, astonished them by challenging them that eating His flesh and drinking His blood equated to eternal life. Partaking of the bread (symbolizing Christ's flesh) and the wine (symbolizing Christ's blood) is an important act in God's eyes. All the blood shed on this earth cannot remotely compare with the value of Christ's blood shed at His crucifixion. His sacrifice provided an atonement for all sin, enabling those whom God has called to be with Him. The blood of this covenant is thicker than any other.

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CGG Weekly; Apr 18, 2014
The Unleavened Bread of Perfection

Clyde Finklea:  Thirty-nine years ago, I observed the Feast of Unleavened Bread for the first time. I remember during those early years, getting the leaven out was heavily stressed. Understanding that leaven represents sin and corruption ...

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Sermon; Feb 9, 2013
Christ, the Chief Cornerstone

Richard Ritenbaugh reminds us that God built His spiritual temple upon the foundation of the prophets and the apostles; both the Old and New Testaments provide a vital part of our underpinning. Jesus Christ is the principal part of the foundation. If our foundation is flawed, our edifice cannot stand. We need to focus on the true essentials of Christianity. The source of Paul's cornerstone metaphor of Ephesians 2:20-22 was the actual stones used to construct the physical Temple). One such stone was 45 feet long and weighted over 600 tons. The stones of the Temple were perfectly cut to fit together with the chief corner stone, the load bearing (and hence, most important) part of the structure, upon which all the other stones must be fitted and measured against. God has laid the Cornerstone (symbolizing Jesus Christ) to provide real salvation. We must be built on the chief Cornerstone-Jesus Chris, the Bread of Life (our Spiritual source of nourishment which we must avidly ingest and digest), the Light of the World (revealing things to us), the Door (the entry way or access point and fellowship to the Father, as well as protection and separation from the world), the Good Shepherd (taking care of us as His sheep, knowing each by name), the Resurrection and the Life (the Eternal Life that He experiences now and will provide to us), the Way, the Truth, and the Life (the means and example of salvation, our point of contact with God), the Vine (the Source of our fruit-bearing potential as an organism in Christ), the King of Kings, and the I AM (the Creator of heaven and earth).

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Sermon; Feb 2, 2013
Fully Accepting God's Sovereignty (Part Six, Conclusion)

John Ritenbaugh, maintaining that our responsibility is to yield to God's sovereignty, nevertheless suggests that God has, by giving us free will, enabled us to freely sin, but holds us responsible for governing ourselves. The word govern, derived from the Latin noun gubern?tor, indicates a regulating, as in steering a ship with a rudder. The edict to submit to civil authority has a built-in exception when the civil government has explicitly asked us to do something contrary to God's Law. No power exists that is not in some degree permitted by God. All governments have the responsibility to protect the law-abiding, to punish evil doers, and to establish peace. The American government was established in a climate of rebellion against oppression and a desire to be free. The Founding Fathers were educated men, schooled in English Law and the ordinances of the Bible. John Adams warned that this government, based on maximum liberty, would only work for a moral citizenry. Sadly, the current citizenry is more concerned about their own selfish obsessions for entitlements than the welfare of the nation. God's government has also given us maximum liberty, but we have a daunting responsibility to govern ourselves. We have been called by God to do God's will, following in Christ's steps. In order to regulate ourselves, we must have the same kind of vision that Abraham and Moses possessed, leading them to the Promised Land. This vision can only occur if we have Christ within us, producing spiritual fruit. Without Christ, we can do nothing. As the physical Israelites had to eat manna to be sustained, the spiritual Israelites must be sustained on the true bread, the Word of God and the Holy Spirit (the mind of God the Father and Jesus Christ), giving us the ability to keep His commandments.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; January 2013
Fully Accepting God's Sovereignty (Part Four)

Government may very well be the most important subject in all the Bible because it contains the vital knowledge of how Christians are to govern themselves under the sovereignty of God. John Ritenbaugh concludes his series on our full acceptance of God's sovereignty by highlighting how Christ helps us to follow God's will as He did.

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Sermonette; Apr 13, 2012
Filling the Void

David Grabbe, reflecting on the specific hardwiring of our gustatory glands (or taste buds), affirms that leavened bread beats unleavened bread. Throughout the Scriptures, bread serves as a metonym for food in general, or what we need to live—the staff of life. In the Middle East, bread symbolizes life itself (or that which sustains life). Bread, because of its rich source of B vitamins, helps to produce serotonin, regulating our moods, making our hearts glad. Similarly, our spiritual taste buds have been hardwired to crave spiritual contact with God Almighty. Some scientists have referred to this universal craving as the God gene, a built-in desire to believe in something. The only way this spiritual hunger can be satisfied is by the Bread of Life (John 6:47-51). If we try to satisfy this craving through any other means, such as false religion, idolatry, food, sports, entertainment, technology, fashion, money, travel, etc., we will be left unsatisfied and disillusioned. The more we taste the heavenly Bread, the more aware we will become of our spiritual hunger, and the more we will try to satisfy this craving with legitimate spiritual manna—Jesus Christ, the Bread of Life. If we hunger and thirst for righteousness, our craving will be satisfied.

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Bible Study; January 2011
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Feeding the Five Thousand (Part Two)

The feeding of the five thousand—a miracle attested in all four gospels—tells us far more than the fact that Jesus was a marvelous miracle-worker. Martin Collins shows that it also reveals Christ's compassion on those who hunger, as well as His ability to teach vital lessons to His disciples—lessons we, too, can learn.

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CGG Weekly; Nov 27, 2009
Manna and the Preparation Day (Part Two)

David C. Grabbe:  In last week's essay, we traced the connection between manna and "the true bread from heaven," Jesus Christ (John 6:32). ...

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CGG Weekly; Nov 20, 2009
Manna and the Preparation Day (Part One)

David C. Grabbe:  Because of how precious time is, God wants us to make the most of the Sabbath, that time that is transcendentally better than the rest of the week. Thus, in His providence, He gave us the Preparation Day, which sets the stage so that we can properly receive the gift of the Sabbath. ...

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Sermon; Apr 18, 2009
Freedom, Liberty, and Bondage

John Ritenbaugh, distinguishing the terms freedom and liberty, suggests that Christian liberty is far more restrained than the word freedom would connote. Mainstream Christianity often obscures the major emphasis of God's purpose in our lives, focusing on a genie in a bottle endlessly showering miracles. God deliberately put His chosen people through testing, trails, and deprivation to see what they would do and how they would respond to His laws. Building character and conforming to Christ's image requires suffering, privations, testing, and trials, including the degradation of slavery. We are still suffering under the bondage of sin. Through God's grace, we are provided liberty with specified limits and boundaries. Grace is not the entire story, especially after we leave Egypt. We are to deny worldly lusts, putting out sin, having been obliged to live in godliness, preparing to live in good works. Consequently, grace places limits on our freedom, training us for our future life in the Kingdom of God. Our behavior must be clearly distinguishable from the non-believers in society. We cannot emulate our forebears, who although freed from Egypt, maintained their slave mentality, immersed in their worldly lusts, rebelling before they even commenced through the Red Sea, grumbling about their diet. We must desire the life-giving manna, the Bread of Life, namely the instruction provided through God's Word, producing good conduct and good life, keeping us from the bondage of sin. We need to be continually packing our minds with the Truth of God, fortifying our goal of attaining the Kingdom of God.

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Commentary; Mar 28, 2009
The Food Crisis

Martin Collins, reflecting on a UN News Center article on a proposed summit to be held in Rome in 2009 addressing devastating food shortages in the world (with 963 million people in the world are reported as malnourished) suggests that the UN desires to create a "new world food order ." In another article from the Catholic News Service Website, the food crisis was characterized as a "ticking time bomb," partly caused by undisciplined speculation in food commodities and price fixing. Unwisely diverting food for bio-fuel has also threatened the world food supply. Consequently, half the food which could have been used for human consumption has been lost. Waste, unfortunately, has been increasing exponentially. In both the United States and Australia, one third of the produce is lost between the field and the table. In Britain, half of the food is also wasted and not eaten. Consequently, food costs are predicted to rise exponentially from 50% to 90%. The sins of mankind have brought about this devastating shortfall, emanating predictably from false religion leading to war leading to famine leading to disease. The world will reap what it has sown, but God's called out ones must realize that God promises to supply all of our needs, not allowing any who trust in him to suffer physical or spiritual hunger.

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Ready Answer; November 2007
Ask and It Will Be Given

Sometime in their Christian lives, many people hit a plateau in their growth and go little further. Have we have overlooked the simple principle of "ask and it will be given" spoken by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount?

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Sermon; Mar 31, 2007
Jesus Is God

John Ritenbaugh asserts that if Jesus Christ is not who He said He is, He would be the most successful charlatan in the history of the world. The understanding that Jesus Christ is the God of the Old Testament has always been challenged. God's called-out ones do not have pre-eminence in intellectual prowess, but God has made the truths of the Bible clear through the Holy Spirit, making available the spiritual gifts of faith and understanding, enabling us to decipher the mysteries of the Bible. Jesus' point of origin (having been with the Father and coming down from heaven) gives Him credibility that Moses or any other religious leader could never have. The Son (having inhabited eternity with the Father as a member of the God-kind) was also known as the Word, by whom the world was created. In this capacity, He has always interfaced between mankind and the Father, having primacy as our Lord, Master, and Ruler of creation.

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Sermon; Apr 12, 2004
Does Doctrine Really Matter? (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh cautions that most religious-professing people (including many members of the greater church of God) have not used the Word of God as their standard of morality and conduct, but instead are allowing society and culture to shape their attitudes, tolerating the disgusting incremental escalating perversion of moral standards. Sadly, society is rapidly replicating the dangerous downward spiral extant during the time of Noah, a time in which the intent of every thought was to do evil. People (conditioned or reinforced by the mass media) rely upon their deceitful 'hearts' or 'feelings' rather than the Bible to determine moral standards. The House of Joseph (often claiming to be the last bastion of morality) now leads the world in exporting filth to the rest of mankind. Our only safeguard against moral pollution is to ingest (or assimilate) God's word (spiritual manna- or the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth) every day of our lives.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; May 2003
The Offerings of Leviticus (Part Three): The Meal Offering

The meal offering represents another aspect of the perfect offering of Jesus Christ. John Ritenbaugh shows that it symbolizes the perfect fulfillment of the second great commandment, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself."

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Sermon; Dec 23, 2000
Maintaining Good Health (Part 12)

God has often used micro metaphors to illustrate macro events. For example, in Isaiah 1:4-6, God compares the whole nation of Israel to a sick patient with an incurable disease, signalling impending captivity. The church has been alternately compared to a bride, vine, virgin, woman, mother, and body. Extrapolating from these metaphors, the condition of the greater church of God resembles a patient languishing from a deadly disease like cancer. This condition has resulted from a diet of spiritual junk food (the philosophies and traditions of the world) and abstinence from the life-sustaining bread of life (John 6:63). The words we "eat" create a faith that forms the walls of our belief system?a kind of spiritual immune system, protecting it from disease. Good health, then, is not merely a matter of diet, but an entire interactive process of prayer, study, obedience, and conformity to God's purpose for our lives.

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Ready Answer; January 1999
Have You Had Your Manna Today?

God provided physical Israel manna to eat every day for forty years. Now we, as spiritual Israel, have the Bible, God's Word, as our daily bread. Are we taking advantage every day of this wonderful blessing God gives us, or are we allowing God's Word to spoil through neglect?

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Sermon; Apr 4, 1996
James and Unleavened Bread (Part 1)

In this Unleavened Bread sermon, Richard Ritenbaugh asserts that learning God's way (and unlearning Satan's way) takes a lifetime- spiritually speaking, perhaps the most difficult and arduous task on the entire earth. Over a lifetime, with our cooperation, God fashions us into vessels of honor. The commands to eat unleavened bread outnumber the commands to refrain from eating leavened bread three to one, indicating that the most efficient way of eliminating sin is to do righteousness (eating God's word and applying its principles in our lives) If we do good, we won't have the time to do bad. The epistle of James applies to the Christian after the justification process has begun, indicating that after receiving forgiveness, after receiving God's implanted word, we are obligated to fulfill God's purpose in our lives, yielding to trials, bringing forth the fruits of character by doing (not just hearing) God's word. Paul and James steadfastly agree that faith without works is stone dead.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Dec 16, 1986
John (Part 12)

John Ritenbaugh insists that because what we believe automatically determines what we do; it is impossible to separate faith and works. If our source of belief is not grounded in Jesus Christ, we will be held captive to our traditions and our works will be contaminated. If our belief is grounded in Christ (our Spiritual Bread and our High Priest), we will have a relationship with God and access to eternal abundant life, leading to works (fruits of the Holy Spirit) that glorify God. The word "draw" in John 6:44 implies that there is some degree of carnal resistance or reluctance to accept God's calling. If we do not metaphorically eat the flesh of Christ and drink His blood, ingesting the Word of God daily, we will die spiritually. The moral and ethical demands of these Words often make them "hard sayings," but yielding to these demands (having an intimate relationship of God- living the way God lives in every aspect of our lives) will incrementally develop the character and the spiritual mind, bringing about eternal abundant life.


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