God's Rest (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Coveting—lust—is a fountainhead of many other sins. Desiring things is not wrong, but desiring someone else's things promotes overtly sinful behavior.


The Consequences of Affluence

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

'Affluenza' describes the bloated insensitivity caused by trying to keep up with the Joneses, the stress caused by doggedly pursuing the American Dream.


God's Rest (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Lust begets a guilty conscience, agitation, anxiety, depression, grief, torment. Wrong desire leads to lying, adultery, and murder—eventually leading to death.


Thou Shall Not Covet

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

Because virtually every sin begins as a desire in the mind, the command against coveting (lustful cravings) could be the key to keeping the other commandments.


The Commandments (Part Nineteen)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus taught that all outward sin stems from inner inordinate desire. What we desire or lust after automatically becomes our idol.


God Works in Mysterious Ways (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

For His Own reasons, God has chosen not to reveal His plan to those the world considers wise, but, instead, to work with the weaker sort of mankind.


Our Part in the Sanctification Process (Part Ten): Cultivating the Fruit of Self Control

Sermon by David F. Maas

It is impossible to cultivate self-control unless one uses God's Spirit to reprogram the desires of the heart from self-centeredness to submission to God.


Self-Discipline

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Greeks, especially the Stoics, thought highly of self-discipline. As described in the Scriptures, self-discipline (or self-control) means the deliberate, enormous, and sustained effort (hence, a work) of controlling one's carnal drives and desires. Protestant theology recognizes that Christian self-discipline presents a …


The Will To Change

Sermonette by Joseph B. Baity

Like the fable of the scorpion who stings the frog carrying him, our carnal nature is set, causing us to act in destructive ways. Repentance begins with changed thinking.


Are We Redeeming the Time?

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Time is fleeting; any of us could perish tomorrow. Procrastination in matters of godliness can be fatal, as the parable of the rich fool teaches.


The Counting Lessons #2 and #3

Sermonette by Gary Garrett (1950-2019)

Gary Garrett, focusing upon Exodus 15:27, shows the symbolism of the twelve springs of water and the seventy palm trees, deriving two significant lessons as we count toward Pentecost: When God calls us and gives us His Spirit, He 1.) gives us the opportunity to grow and 2.) to see God. Bullinger suggests that the number 70 …