Forget Not All His Benefits

Sermonette by Clyde Finklea

Clyde Finklea asserts that we as a people should thank God for our nation—a nation in which we have an abundance to eat in an environment of peace. President Washington issued a proclamation establishing a day of thanksgiving; later, President Lincoln thanked God for civil and religious liberty, adding his supplications …


Lest We Forget

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that Modern Israel has difficulty remembering God, and not remembering God's providence and His mercy, reminds us that we are descendants of this forgetful tribe. Ingratitude has been one of the most disgusting traits in the Israelitish culture, a trait that can only be corrected by thankfulness. …


A Time For Thanksgiving

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our annual Thanksgiving, as developed from the early settlers who called themselves Pilgrims (temporary dwellers on a journey), was derived from the harvest festivals, patterned after the annual Holy Days such as Pentecost and Tabernacles. Unfortunately, the modern descendants of Jacob have all but forgotten their relationship …


Faith and Remembering

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

We will not have faith tomorrow simply because we had it yesterday; we must renew faith daily by deliberately remembering God's prior interventions.


Why We Tithe (Part 3)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh reiterates that the motivation for giving this sermon was not because the Church of the Great God needed the money or brethren had forsaken the doctrines, but instead to examine the spiritual reasons and benefits for tithing. God uses the tithe as a learning experience to teach us to give as He does, helping …


The Fruit of Existentialism

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, citing Ezekiel 34:1-3, Jeremiah 18:13, and Isaiah 1:1-3, focusing on God's charge that we destroy ourselves from within, declares that our leaders have used existentialism as a major tool to accomplish this destruction. The political and educational leaders are far more culpable in this charge than are the …


Hosea's Prophecy (Part Four)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Both Israel and Judah during Hosea's time adopted paganism from the surrounding nations. Syncretistic religion blends paganism and Christianity.


Prosperity: What Is True Wealth?

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, distinguishing between prosperity and wealth, asserts that prosperity is success that comes to those who have been active in achieving it and/or by divine grace, usually as a result of effort. Along with material wealth are offspring, and spiritual blessings such as character or grace in the eyes of an …


The Feast of Tabernacles and Unleavened Bread

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

Both Tabernacles and Unleavened Bread keep us off balance so that we remain humble, seek stability, and trust in God's providence for our ultimate destiny.


Deuteronomy and History

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reminds us that everything in life matters; we should carefully consider all things that come in our purview. The instruction of Deuteronomy, written in the last month of Moses' life after wandering in the wilderness for 40 years, enabled Israel to live successfully in the Promised Land and was to be reviewed …


Prayer Does Make a Difference

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

God does not hear a prayer of pride, selfishness, and self exaltation, but He listens to prayers of supplication and intercession for the saints.


No Longer Brain Dead

Sermon by Mark Schindler

Mark Schindler, reflecting that 40 is the number of trial and, coincidentally, the number of his and Nancy's anniversary, ruminates about the early days when he asked his future father-in-law's permission to marry his daughter. Forty years constituted the length of the wilderness trek of our ancestors, a time when they …


The Handwriting is on the Wall (2008)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this keynote address of the 2008 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh, describing the scene in the parking lot following a university football game, in which garbage, litter, and abandoned automobiles covered the grounds, suggested that this scene provided a snapshot of the moral state of America, displaying the despicable …