The Feast: Vacation or Holy Time?

CGG Weekly by Mark Schindler

The Feast of Tabernacles has aspects of a vacation, yet its purpose is far more serious and spiritual. We know this, but what do we practice?


Holy as He is Holy

Sermonette by Ronny H. Graham

Becoming holy is a process that spans an entire lifetime, which includes embracing God's holy days and tithes. Becoming holy takes continuous practice


Amos (Part 9)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh observed that ancient Israel had regarded Bethel (as well as Gilgal and Beer Sheba) as a sacred shrine (a place where Jacob had been transformed —his name changed to Israel) but were not becoming spiritually transformed as a result of pilgrimages to these locations. One example of their residual carnality …


Amos 5 and the Feast of Tabernacles

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

How can we evaluate whether our Feast is 'good' or not? God's criticism of Israel's feasts in Amos 5 teaches what God wants us to learn from His feasts.


Amos 5 and the Feast of Tabernacles

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

If we go to the Feast with the goal of physically enjoying, we may lose out on both the spiritual and physical benefits. 'Going through the motions' defiles it.


Amos (Part 10)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh warns the greater Church of God that since we constitute the Israel of God, the book of Amos directly applies to us. The pilgrimages to Gilgal made by the people of ancient Israel were repulsive to God because no permanent change (in terms of justice ' hating evil and loving good or righteous behavior) occurred …


Amos (Part 8)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh points out that Amos severely chides Israel for exalting symbolism over substance, superstitiously trusting in locations where significant historical events occurred: Bethel- the location of Jacob's pillar stone and Jacob's conversion; Gilgal- the location where the manna ceased and the Israelites partook of the …


Amos 5 and the Feast

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Just because we keep God's feasts does not necessarily mean we are in sync with God's Law or intent. The Israelites kept the feasts in a carnal manner.


Fearing God at the Feast (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The Feast is not a celebration just for the sake of having a good time. Our festivities should focus on God's faithfulness, rejoicing in all He did during the year.


Are the Blood Moons Significant? (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

It is unusual for lunar eclipses to occur on God's holy days. Understanding those days helps us to find the right significance to the blood moons.


Are These Your Feasts? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by Mark Schindler

As we closed Part One, we saw that Jesus Himself requested of the Father that His disciples, which we are, be sanctified: "I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, ...


Do You See God Working in You?

Sermon by Kim Myers

Job was able to endure the multiple trials and tragic events by seeing the hand of God in his life, realizing that God works in both good and bad times.


Prepare to Meet Your God! (The Book of Amos) (Part One)

Booklet by John W. Ritenbaugh

The book of Amos is an astounding prophecy, closely paralleling the conditions in the Western world today. Amos reveals how unrighteousness undermines society.


The Feast of Tabernacles and Unleavened Bread

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

Both Tabernacles and Unleavened Bread keep us off balance so that we remain humble, seek stability, and trust in God's providence for our ultimate destiny.


Rejoice in God's Feast

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God can take satisfaction that He is doing the right thing, and thus His rejoicing can even come from painful judgments. Sarcificing and rejoicing are linked.


Looking Back to the Future

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The dwelling in booths and the sacrifices were the context for rejoicing at the Feast of Tabernacles. The booths depict our current lives as pilgrims.


Whatsoever Your Heart Desires

Sermonette by Mark Schindler

We must not construe the term, "whatever our heart desires," as a pass to sin, but we should use every occasion to grow in thinking and acting like God.