Control and Self-Control

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Paradoxically, when we yield to God's sovereignty, He wants to cede control over to us, teaching us to develop self-control as an ingrained habit.


Ground Hog Day - Again?

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Bill Onisick, reflecting on a theme in the 1993 movie Groundhog Day, in which a weatherman (played by Bill Murray, who gets caught in a blizzard he failed to predict, doomed to relive the same day over again until he gets it right) sees a spiritual parallel in our process of overcoming well-entrenched perennial sins. …


The Nanny Church (Part One)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Jesus does not want 'serving' through iron-fisted control and ruling by fear, nor does He mean 'benevolently' doing for them what they can do for themselves.


Self-Government (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

If we govern ourselves, God will take care of us. Government of any kind will not work unless people govern their own nature. Self-control enables us to show love.


Self-Government (Part One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Regardless of whether one submits to God, government, or community, self-government is the best means to having a safe, smooth course toward an objective.


Self-Government and Responsibility (Part One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We need free moral agency to be transformed into God's image. Unless one has God's Spirit, he cannot exercise the internal control to be subject to the way of God.


Is the United States a Christian Nation? (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

A true Christian is sanctified by a specific body of beliefs and how he lives. No mainstream church in America has ever yielded itself to the right doctrines.


What I Believe About Conspiracy Theories

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The drive toward one world government is a transparent reality having several biblical prototypes, all inspired by demonic opposition to God's rule.


Titus 2:11-14

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We are obligated to dress and keep what is placed in our care, improving what He has given to us. We dare not stand still, but must make effort to grow.


The Handwriting is on the Wall: Conspiracies

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this keynote address of the 2009 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh, commenting upon the Steven Spielberg movie Munich (a movie depicting an event in which the Palestinians murdered Jewish athletes in 1972 at the Munich Olympic games), describes how Israeli death squads were formed to retaliate against the Palestinians. …


Is the United States a Christian Nation? (Part Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

America has never embraced true Christianity as its dominant faith, nor has it ever really followed Christ, but has instead embraced a counterfeit.


Trust Issues

Sermonette by Austin Del Castillo

Austin Del Castillo reminds us that the end of the Feast of Tabernacles represents the last century and one half of God's Millennial rule, a time when entirety of earth's population will be living under God's Law. At the end of the thousand years, God will release Satan from the Bottomless Pit. He will immediately set about …


Psalms: Book One (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, asking us whether we trust the current Federal government, points out that, according to recent polls, confidence in government has eroded to an all-time historical low, with only 13% of the citizenry believing government does right most of the time, 10% believing government never does anything right, while …


Are Your Feelings Fighting Your Faith?

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, suggesting that, while society has rejected religious principles and faith, it has glommed onto superficial feelingséwhatever feels good to us. Today's Christianity is more theatrics than theological; feelings have become the replacement for faith. When we stifle the truth of God's word to accommodate feelings, …


The Providence of God (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, citing the maxim that 'the apple doesn't fall very far from the tree,' suggests that the nation of Israel and the Israel of God, having the same aggresive, controlling, and contentious spirit as their forefather Jacob, must learn to let God provide blessings rather than, through crafty scheming, grabbing them …