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Physicians

Go to Bible verses for: Physicians

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Commentary; Apr 28, 2018
Forgers of Lies

Martin Collins, observing that the greatest epidemic of the 21st Century may be the use of drugs, focuses not on the plague of illicit drugs but on the danger posed by prescription drugs, offered to a gullible public by a pharmaceutical industry more interested in profits than in individuals' health and well-being. Investigative reporter John Rappoport, citing a study conducted by the late Dr. Barbara Starfield, notes the deaths caused by prescription drugs now exceed those caused by automobile accidents and have, over the years, come to exceed casualty-of-war statistics. In addition, pharmaceutical companies push vaccines which have never been properly tested onto a fearful public. The Center for Disease Control admits that the average drug may contain up to 70 side effects, with some having more than 500 negative reactions. The Bible does not condemn physicians, but it pulls no punches on worthless physicians who misdiagnose (Job 13:1-5). The mortality rates stemming from the misuse and abuse of prescription drug certainly indicate that mis-informed physicians are still with us. God's called-out ones must exercise discernment when considering health care alternatives which heal rather than poison. God has given us the herb for food and healing (Genesis 1:29 and Revelation 22:2).

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Bible Study; March 2010
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Healing a Woman With a Flow of Blood

Jesus' healing of the woman who had a flow of blood for twelve years is unique among His miraculous healings in that He healed her without speaking a word. Martin Collins explains the woman's genuine faith and how Jesus used the occasion to bring glory to God.

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Sermon; Feb 19, 2005
Faith and Healing (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh insists that God's promise to heal (spiritually or physically) is inextricably coupled with the obligation to exercise responsibility, demonstrating physical and spiritual works in accordance with existing laws, while trusting in God throughout the healing process. The Bible is replete with individuals applying physical remedies (balms, poultices, as well as a competent physician's counsel) in tandem with trusting God. We cannot (in the manner of Asa and Ahaziah) leave God out of any process in our lives. As we pursue healing, we must 1) first seek God, 2) begin working on the solution, seeking wise counsel, 3) repent from the sin that has caused the malady, and 4) ardently obey God's laws, requiring works. Complying with these conditions, all who trust God will be healed in His time and His manner. Exercising faith in healing is in no way passive. God is creating problem solvers—not problem continuers.

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Sermon; Jan 29, 2005
Faith and Healing (Part 2)

John Ritenbaugh emphasizes the necessity of work (dressing and keeping our life, our health, our possessions, our calling, etc.). God has called us to a lifetime of productive work. We cannot allow Satan to cause us to resent working or to feel victimized, slighted, bitter, or lazy, rejecting God's ordained purpose for us—creating obedient children who work as He does. It takes hard work to live up to the virtues of God; it does not happen automatically. Living by faith requires patience but certainly not passivity; it requires that we work toward a God-ordained purpose (of which we currently do not entirely see the outcome). Both spiritual and physical healing require us to work intensely, asking for God's merciful intervention while actively working toward a solution, exercising wisdom and common sense as we consider the array of possible procedures.

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Article; February 2001
Spotlight on Luke

Luke, the writer of the gospel of that name and the book of Acts, is more significant to the New Testament than it may first appear. Though he cast the spotlight on others like Christ and Paul, what we know of his life contains lessons we can use.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Dec 30, 1981
Matthew (Part 14)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Matthew 9:2-9 recounts an event in which an evangelist criticized Herbert W. Armstrong for suggesting that healing constitutes a forgiveness of sin. The effects of sin on successive generations are clearly seen in Exodus 20:5. Sin causes disease, but the person who becomes sick does not necessarily commit the sin. Because God alone can forgive sin, God alone can heal. Matthew, a former publican, was nevertheless made an apostle by Jesus Christ. Matthew's need to overcome stands in stark contrast to the Pharisees smug condemnatory righteousness. Christianity is a joyous experience we share with Christ. The reactionary Pharisees, bogged down with manmade traditions, were extremely resistant to new truth and change. Human nature is passionately attached to the status quo. Consequently, the new teachings of Christ are incompatible with the teachings we learned from our parents or society. Even with our inadequacies, Jesus will nevertheless grant us our requests if they are according to God's will. We should remember that the best teaching is always done through example. [NB: This series of Bible Studies from 1981-82 is incomplete.]


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