Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Passover as Memorial of Christ's Death

Go to Bible verses for: Passover as Memorial of Christ's Death

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Mar 24, 2018
The Spring Holy Days

Ryan McClure, acknowledging that we are about to enter another Spring holy day cycle, urges us to probe into the deeper meaning of these days more than we have previously, reminding us that God's wisdom is unsearchable. We discover that Jesus Christ's sacrifice was foreordained before the foundation of the world to permit the successful reproduction of the God-kind, fashioning mankind in His image. From the first blood-sign on the doorpost saving the first born of ancient Israel from physical death (signifying obedience to God's commands), Jesus Christ's blood sacrifice provides the means for us to be justified, beginning the lengthy sanctifying process through which we acquire the boldness to enter the sanctuary of God's throne room. The days of Unleavened Bread picture the putting out of sin as we leave Egypt (symbolic of our past slavery to sin). The 50-day trek toward Pentecost pictures our converted walk following Jesus Christ, receiving God's Holy Spirit to become one of the First-fruits, an heir to the Kingdom of God and a member of God's family. We should use this sacred time to dive deeper into things God has planned for us.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Mar 12, 2016
The Passover Memorial

Ted bowling, marveling that a large number of Americans are oblivious to the significance of annual national observations such as Memorial Day, Thanksgiving, and a National Moment of Remembrance, suggests that the majority of professing ' Christians' are ignorant of the significance of the Passover, both the details of the Exodus from Egypt as well as the details of Christ's sacrifice. The Passover is a somber anniversary of Christ's death to be observed by God's called-out ones until His return. We are to soberly reflect on the details of the Passover, preparing by studying the details of the first Passover in Exodus, followed by the Gospel accounts of the Passover celebrated by Christ and His disciples, as well as Psalm 22, getting into the spirit of this most somber event.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Jun 13, 2015
The Lord's Supper

Mike Ford, reflecting on a Lutheran memorial service he had attended, describes the liturgical formula in a Lutheran service, including communion at the end of the service. The entire nominal Christian world (Orthodox, Protestant, and Roman Catholic) appears oblivious to the understanding that a memorial (such as Memorial Day, Fourth of July, or Pearl Harbor Day) is kept annually. Equivocating with the expression “as oft as you drink it in remembrance of me,” the world’s churches believe they can do this ritual monthly, weekly, daily, or on any special occasion. Many argue that since we do not know the exact hour that Christ and his disciples kept the Passover, we can keep it whenever we want. It is further argued that since Christ changed the symbols of the Passover, the “spiritual intent is more important than the physical ritual, rendering the exact time of its observance unimportant.” Some sentimentalize the Passover ceremony by suggesting that, since newlyweds often celebrate the anniversary of their first date on a monthly basis, Christians also could take the Lord’s Supper in a similar manner. Another spurious argument made is Paul’s admonition in I Corinthians 11:21-22 against drunkenness at these events, suggesting that this was perhaps a frequent occurrence. The changing of the symbols at Passover did not augment the days people could keep it; the frequent practice of a Lord’s Supper derives from Pagan, not biblical origins. The Passover is a once a year ceremony for all baptized members.

Show more Show less
Ready Answer; January 2015
Why Was Jesus Not Crucified as Passover Began? (Part One)

Many Bible students scratch their heads over a seeming discrepancy in timing between the Old Testament instructions about Passover and Christ's fulfillment of it in His crucifixion. Contending that the spiritual fulfillment is far more important than physical rites, David Grabbe relates that Jesus did indeed fulfill the Passover—just not as one might expect.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Mar 21, 2014
A Worthy Manner?

Pat Higgins:  As Passover approaches, consider the warning Paul gives to us in I Corinthians 11:27-31: Therefore whoever eats this bread or drinks this cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. ...

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Jan 31, 2014
Evaluating the Price of Redemption

Of all of God's appointed times, the Passover is one that we should not just rush into without thought and preparation. If we do so, we will miss the awesome depth of its meaning, placing ourselves in danger of taking the Passover unworthily. ...

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Mar 23, 2012
Rehearsing God's Plan

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  This weekend marks the beginning of a new sacred year; in fact, this Sabbath is the first day of the year on the Hebrew calendar. God tells Moses in Exodus 12:2, “This month shall ...

Show more Show less
Ready Answer; March 2006
What Is the Passover Anyway?

To someone not familiar with the Bible's instructions regarding the keeping of Passover, this festival can seem strange and confusing. This article explains the basic points of the Passover, showing from Scripture what God commands and why.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 24, 2005
The First Day of Unleavened Bread (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh observes that someone had recently taught that Passover, rather than the Night to be Much Observed, should be designated the first day of Unleavened Bread. Leviticus 23:5-6 designates two separate festivals: the Passover (on Abib/Nisan 14) and the Feast of Unleavened Bread (on Abib/Nisan 15; see also Numbers 28:16-18). Deuteronomy 16:6 indicates that the Passover took place on the eve of Nisan 14 at ben ha arbayim (twilight). Numbers 33:3 clearly shows that the departure from Egypt took place on Nisan 15, the day after the Passover. Exodus 12:18 delineates that the eating of unleavened bread runs from the end of Nisan 14 (at ba erev - the end of the day) to the end of Nisan 21 (at ba erev). John 13:29; Matthew 26:5; John 19:31; 40-42 plainly prove that Christ, the disciples, the chief priests, the Jews, and Nicodemus did not consider the Passover a holy day, but a preparation day.

Show more Show less
Bible Study; March 1996
Holy Days: Passover

Though not a holy day, per se, Passover may be the most important festival ordained by God. Not only does it memorialize Christ's death, it also symbolizes our redemption and forgiveness, allowing us to have eternal life!

Show more Show less
'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 1996
Christ, Our Passover

Many people believe that our sins are the focus of Passover—but they are wrong! John Ritenbaugh shows that Christ, the Passover Lamb, should be our focus. How well do you know Him?

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 15, 1995
Christ's Death, Resurrection, and Ascension

In this sermon on the death, resurrection, and ascension of Christ, Richard Ritenbaugh, using three consecutive Psalms (22-24), affirms that Jesus Christ was the antitype, perfectly fulfilling the Old Testament types, slain as the Lamb of God on Passover, Nisan 14, resurrected with the cutting of the wavesheaf at the conclusion of the Sabbath, and ascended to His Father at the time of the waving of the sheaf.

Show more Show less
'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 1994
Passover, Obligation, and Love

John Ritenbaugh discusses how Christ's redemption of us obligates us to obey and serve Him. We show our gratitude for this priceless gift by doing good in acts of love and service to others.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 3, 1993
The Awesome Cost of Salvation

In this Passover message, John Ritenbaugh observes that the world's religions are in abject bondage to falsehood because they do not observe the Passover. Freedom comes to God's called out ones incrementally from continuing on the way- the relationship between God and us. It is this relationship which is the most important thing Christ has died for. We need to be sobered at the awesomeness of the cost to set us free from sin- how far Christ was willing to be pushed. Immense have been the preparations for our ransom- involving billions of years (Hebrews 11:3, I Corinthians 10:11) and the death of our Savior. Because we have been purchased, we have an obligation to our Purchaser.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 11, 1992
Passover (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh insists that nine steps had to be included with the Passover process, including the eating of the lamb, all within the house until the morning. The time frame designated for Passover was ben ha arbayim—a period of time between the going down of the sun and complete darkness (dusk), totally within the confines of the designated day, in this case the fourteenth, as God had commanded. To use scholarship that contradicts the Bible—relying upon tradition rather than God's Word—is not unlike carrying the Ark of the Covenant in the oxcart.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Mar 28, 1992
Passover (Part 1)

In this foundational message on the Passover, John Ritenbaugh insists that the annual reaffirmation of the covenant—through the Passover—is at the heart and core of an on-going relationship with Jesus Christ and God the Father, a life-and-death choice beginning the process to perfection. The Passover, specifically commanded on the fourteenth at twilight(dusk), is a memorial of God's passing over the firstborn covered by the blood, distinctly different from the memorial of "going out from Egypt (Unleavened Bread).

Show more Show less
Sermon/Bible Study; Mar 3, 1987
John (Part 20)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the seed analogy of Jesus in John 12:24, emphasizes that sacrifice is absolutely necessary (the seed must give up its life) in order for quality fruit to be produced. Using this seed planting analogy, Jesus teaches that, as a seed must be planted, dying to itself in order to bear fruit, we similarly must sacrifice our lives- submitting our wills unconditionally to God's will in order to bear abundant fruit, attaining the abundant life we deeply crave. Conversely, if we try to placate the natural carnal lusts, we will not bear good fruit. After we die to sin in the waters of baptism, we no longer dedicate ourselves to satisfying our carnal drives, but instead to submit to God, who engineers the process of our spiritual growth into a new spiritual creation, children of light, reflecting the characteristics of our spiritual Parent. Keeping God's Commandments leads to spiritual insight and light, but breaking them leads to spiritual blindness and darkness. There is no neutrality in following God's Word. John 13:1-17 provides an unusual insight into the very mind of God, exemplified as a serving "footwashing" attitude, demonstrating servant leadership toward His creation, an attitude and behavior we are obligated to emulate. The essence of love is sacrifice.

Show more Show less
Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1974
How Often Should We Partake of the Lord's Supper?

The biblical proof that God's people should keep the Passover (the Lord's Supper), explaining that it occurs annually on the evening of Nisan 14.

Show more Show less
Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1973
The Plain Truth About Easter

The Resurrection was not on Easter Sunday! Easter is not a Christian name, but the title of the idolatrous "queen of heaven." Here's an explanation of the true origin and meaning of Lent, Easter eggs, and sunrise services!


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Passover as Memorial of Christ's Death



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page