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Days of Unleavened Bread

Go to Bible verses about Days of Unleavened Bread

Is Passover on the First Day of Unleavened Bread? (Part One)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Matthew, Mark, and Luke each seem to put Passover on the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, but a closer look reveals the consistency of Scripture.

Is Passover on the First Day of Unleavened Bread? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Jesus and His disciples are shown observing the Passover in a home at the beginning of Abib/Nisan 14. However, a few verses seem to indicate the next day.

Holy Days: Unleavened Bread

Bible Study by Staff

The Feast of Unleavened Bread immediately follows the Passover. In it we see how hard it is to overcome and rid our lives of sin.

Why We Observe Passover and the Days of Unleavened Bread

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We keep Unleavened Bread because of what God did to bring us out of sin (typified by Egypt). While God compels us to make choices, He is with us all the way.

Why Do We Observe Unleavened Bread? (Part One)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The fundamental reason that God gives for the Feast of Unleavened Bread is to remember His deliverance. He delivered Israel physically, but us spiritually.

Why Do We Observe Unleavened Bread? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

If we overlook God's deliverance or neglect the eating of unleavened bread, we will be unable to perform the putting away of sin that God requires.

The Reason for Unleavened Bread

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The Feast of Unleavened Bread signifies far more than the avoidance of leavening. Our focus needs to be on God's management of the process of deliverance.

The Unleavened Bread of Perfection

CGG Weekly by Clyde Finklea

Keeping the leaven out is very important in its own right. However, our primary focus should not be on the leavened bread but on the unleavened bread.

Why Do We Observe Unleavened Bread? (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

It is self-glorifying to focus more on our own efforts in overcoming—which are necessary—than on by whose strength those efforts will succeed.

Unleavened Bread and the Holy Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Egypt is not directly a symbol of sin, but instead the world. The Days of Unleavened Bread symbolize what God did for us, not what we did by our own power.

Grace, Unleavened Bread, and the Holy Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We eat unleavened bread because of what God has done, not what we have done. Eating unleavened bread symbolizes following God and displacing sin.

Unleavened Bread and Pentecost

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Unleavened bread serves as a memorial of God's deliverance from the bondage of sin. We must realize that our part of the salvation process is to follow God.

Freedom and Unleavened Bread

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Christian freedom has nothing to do with location or circumstance but how we think. By imbibing on God's Word, we will incrementally displace our carnality.

James and Unleavened Bread (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The book of James applies to us after the sanctification process has begun. The most effective way of eliminating sin is to do righteousness.

James and Unleavened Bread (Part Three)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh reiterates that the command to eat unleavened Bread outnumbers the command to refrain from eating leavened bread three to one, indicating that if we actively engaged ourselves in studying God's word and doing righteousness, we wouldn't h. . .

Unity and Unleavened Bread

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on Jesus Christ's prayer for unity in John 17, insists that unity with our brethren is impossible without unity with God first. Adam and Eve severed this unity by yielding to Satan's influence, stimulating their minds with a nov. . .

The Selfsame Day

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

The word 'selfsame' refers to a specific commemorative date. The selfsame day is a signal that God is faithfully in control of time over multiple centuries.

Truly Unleavened

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

God has imputed righteousness to us as His Children because we are in Christ. Our state before God is unleavened provided we maintain this relationship.

The Wavesheaf and the Selfsame Day

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The wavesheaf offering is reckoned from the weekly Sabbath within the Days of Unleavened Bread. It had specific requirements that were not met in Joshua 5.

Remaining Unleavened

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh reflects on the second law of thermodynamics which, emphasizes that, as energy is transformed to other forms, it degenerates into a more disordered state, wearing down into entropy, chaos and disorder—exactly the opposite of the Sp. . .

Are God's Holy Days To Be Kept Today?

Sermon/Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

If we do not keep God's holy days, we will deprive ourselves of the knowledge of God's purpose. Jesus and the first century church observed and upheld these days.

Remaining Unleavened

Article by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

We tend to put matters behind us once we are finished with them, but we cannot afford to do this with the lessons we learn from the Days of Unleavened Bread.

Does Paul Condemn Observing God's Holy Days?

'Ready Answer' by Earl L. Henn (1934-1997)

Galatians 4:9-10 is a favorite crutch of those who claim Christians no longer need to observe God's holy days. However, Paul's meaning is quite different.

Deuteronomy 16, Passover, and the Night to be Much Observed

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

In Deuteronomy 16:1, the word 'Passover' is out of context. It applies to the whole season, including the Night to be Much Observed and the Days of Unleavened Bread.

An Extraordinary Feast

'Ready Answer' by Mark Schindler

When God says that His feasts are special, they really are! Mark Schindler explains that we are vicarious participants in the events the feasts memorialize.

The Signs of God (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

God equates belittling His signs with rejecting Him. The signs of the weekly and annual Sabbaths are emphasized by God, but commonly cast aside by men.

Passover (Part Ten)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

At the time of Christ, because of historical deviation, some kept Passover at home at the start of the 14th and others kept it at the Temple at the end of the 14th.

Passover (Part Nine)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The context of Deuteronomy 16:1-3 indicates the focus of these verses is on the Night to be Observed and the Days of Unleavened Bread rather than the Passover.

Do We See the Line?

'Ready Answer' by Mike Ford

Larry McMurtry's Lonesome Dove, a bestselling book and television miniseries in the 1980s, contains the story of a cowboy who fails to perceive the line between right and wrong, and for his lack of moral sense, he pays with his life. Mike Ford consi. . .

How Often Should We Partake of the Lord's Supper?

Booklet by Herbert W. Armstrong

The biblical proof that God's people should keep the Passover (the Lord's Supper), explaining that it occurs annually on the evening of Nisan 14.

Filling the Void

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

David Grabbe, reflecting on the specific hardwiring of our gustatory glands (or taste buds), affirms that leavened bread beats unleavened bread. Throughout the Scriptures, bread serves as a metonym for food in general, or what we need to live—the sta. . .

How Do We Keep God's Festivals?

'Ready Answer' by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Here are the foundational principles to keep in mind in observing the Feasts of God throughout the year.

The Night to be Much Observed

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Night Much to be Observed is a memorial of the covenant with Abraham, and God's watchfulness in delivering ancient Israel as well as spiritual Israel.

Passover (Part Eight)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The temple Passover commanded by Hezekiah was a very unusual circumstance in which the king centralized worship to keep Baalism from defiling the Passover.

Do You Recognize This Man? (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reiterating that everyone has misconceptions about Jesus Christ and His message, maintains that these misconceptions have continued to this very day. Unfortunately, we have brought in false doctrines from the world. In order to experien. . .

Re-education (Part 1)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, after marveling that money spent upon education seems to be inversely proportional to its effectiveness and quality, concludes that re-education is a most difficult (nearly impossible) process. Nevertheless, God Almighty, through the Da. . .

Why We Must Put Out Leaven

Article by Earl L. Henn (1934-1997)

Why must we put leaven out, yet we do not have to circumcise our boys? Earl Henn explains this apparent contradiction.

Leavening, The Types

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh declares that the holy days are reliable, effective, multifaceted teaching tools, emphasizing spaced repetition to reinforce our faulty memories and drive the lesson deep into our thinking. The most effective learning involves drills or exe. . .

Psalms: Book Five (Part Five): Psalm 119 (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Even though keeping the law does not justify us, it does point out to us what sin is. The law is a guide keeping us within moral and ethical boundaries.

The Awesome Cost of Love

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

We assess costs and values all the time in our daily lives. We should employ the same process to God's love for us in giving His Son as the sacrifice for sin.

Our Walk Out of Darkness Into the Light

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

After we accept Christ's sacrifice, we desperately need to come out of sin, walking in light rather than darkness, having continuous fellowship with God.

God's Law in Our Mouths

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, indicating that there are many flashpoints between the greater Church of God and nominal Christianity, suggests that perhaps one of the most significant differences concerns the place and purpose of God's Law. The carnal mind hates and . . .

Psalms: Book One (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Because Jesus is God's Son, we can avoid the rod of His anger by paying respect with worshipful awe. We must know both His instruction and Him personally.

Psalms: Book Five (Part Six): Psalm 119 (Part Three)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The keeping of the law is a practical response to God, providing us with principles for our lives, establishing our character and implanting God's values.

A Subtle Yet Devastating Curse

'Prophecy Watch' by David C. Grabbe

Amos 8:11 speaks of "a famine . . . of hearing the words of the LORD." Such a spiritual famine is occurring today: The words of God are readily available, but few are hearing them. David Grabbe explains this prophecy and its connection to the Feast of Unle. . .

Don't Stand Still!

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh shows that the Days of Unleavened Bread have both a negative and positive aspect. It is not enough to get rid of something negative (get rid of the leavening of sin); if we don't do something positive (eat unleavened bread or do righteousne. . .


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