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Self Control, Lack of

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Sermon; Sep 30, 2017
Fast or Famine

Richard Ritenbaugh, providing some startling statistics showing the wastefulness of Americans, who discard nearly a third of the food they produce annually, states that the western world, and America particularly, is clueless as to what real famine is. Truly, voluntary fasting is not a twin of famine, but it provides an opportunity for God's called-out ones to afflict themselves, to forcefully bring their carnal appetites under subjection, creating the milieu of humble, contemplative reflection concerning the Source of physical and spiritual blessings. Fasting and affliction are always in tandem, producing the humble mindset to reciprocate a special relationship with God Almighty. God has historically used famine as one of the tools to get the Israelites' attention when they violated the terms of the Covenant with Him, forsaking His holy law . We should know that all curses are the result of sin, but if we genuinely repent, God will lift the affliction. God knows the difference between sincere and hypocritical repentance. If we do not want famine, then we should fast with the pure motive of restoring our covenant relationship with God. Because Adam and Eve could not discipline themselves to fast from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, their offspring have been cursed with mortality to this day. As we fast, God draws us closer to Him, just as He sustained Moses during his three nearly consecutive forty-day fasts. Fasting demonstrates obedience to God and expresses self-control, mirroring the character of God, who is always in control. We demonstrate the same desire to obey God when we "fast" from unclean meats. If we fast with a double mind, going through the motions but continuing to treat our fellows shabbily, we are not fasting, but simply going hungry. Fasting merely to get something for ourselves leads to disaster, but if we humble ourselves, repenting of our sins, we reap the benefits from a relationship with God.

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Sermonette; Jul 29, 2017
When Emotions Take Over

Ted Bowling, acknowledging that the full panoply of emotions, including fear and anger, is a gift from God, nevertheless cautions us that we are to use these emotions responsibly, carefully, and with extreme caution. God does not tell us never to be angry, but He has mandated that we channel it constructively. Recently a man killed his wife on a cruise because she just "would not stop laughing at him." His uncontrolled anger has undoubtedly cast a grim shadow on himself and on his hapless family for the rest of their lives. Several Biblical luminaries showed displays of somewhat less than stellar self-control, leading to serious character blemishes, as Peter's angry cursing became punctuated by a rooster's crowing as well as a poignant glance from his Master, and Moses' striking the rock terminated his ambitions to enter the promised land. Like Peter and Moses, we are subject to making major errors and suffering major consequences if we don't rely on God when Satan or the World throws us a curve. I Peter 5:7-8 counsels us to cast our cares upon God in order that our uncontrolled emotions do not keep us from the Kingdom of God.

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Sermonette; Jul 16, 2016
The Times They Are a-Changin'

Clyde Finklea, reflecting on Bob Dylan's lyrics in "The Times They Are A-changin'," reminds us that within hours of Herbert W. Armstrong death, destructive heresies were imported into our previous fellowship by false teachers and ministers. Paul warned Timothy of perilous times to come about at the end of the age, when the character traits of individuals would become predominantly selfish, unforgiving, and unable to control their own impulses. Sadly, the mindset of society has begun to infiltrate the church, causing some of us to leave our first love by compromising the Sabbath and falling into the Commandment -breaking world, God's called-out ones need to wake up and strengthen those things which remain, yielding to God's sovereignty, rejecting the rule of the god of this world, Satan.

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Bible Study; January 2010
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Two Demon-Possessed Men Healed (Part Three)

Jesus Christ performed many miracles, including exorcisms of demons like the evil spirits He cast out of the men near Gadara. Martin Collins explains the significant changes that occurred in the men once the demons were gone.

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CGG Weekly; Apr 25, 2008
On Your Marks . . . Get Set . . .

Charles Whitaker:  Ever jump the gun? When I officiated at junior high and high school track meets years ago, I saw runners do it now and then. ...

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Article; November 2007
Praying Always (Part Five)

Praying always and watching—or overcoming—affect every facet of a Christian's life. Pat Higgins relates how deeply examining ourselves for flaws and shortcomings, as we do each year before Passover, helps us to accomplish Christ's Luke 21:36 command.

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Sermon; Jan 15, 2005
How Can We Develop True Patience?

Martin Collins, reflecting upon the impatience demonstrated in the world's holidays, concludes that most of mankind has a serious patience deficit. Demonstrating or developing patience, a cardinal characteristic of God, in the face of trying events is a clear indication that we are developing genuine godliness. We must learn to turn trials into positive growth opportunities, as did Jacob, who had to develop patience in the midst of myriad, frustrating delays. We must learn to endure patiently, with the help of God's Spirit, waiting for God to accomplish His purpose in us. After identifying 18 negative consequences of impatience, the sermon offers five steps to developing patience: 1) staying focused on the goal, 2) learning to think before speaking, 3) looking for ways to give our service to others, 4) working out our conflicts with others, and 5) working with God through the Spirit to develop godly patience in us, developing a calm, positive attitude and peace of mind.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; January 2005
The Beast and Babylon (Part Nine): Babylon the Great

For being such a religious book, the Bible contains an unusual number of references to harlotry! John Ritenbaugh uses this information to provide understanding of the motivations of Babylon the Great, the Great Harlot of Revelation 17 and 18.

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Sermon; Jun 28, 2003
The Essence of Self-Control

Reflecting on the disgusting decisions made by the U. S. Supreme Court this past week, Martin Collins concludes that this nation has cast off all restraint regarding self- control and regulation of appetite. Self- absorbed and self - indulgent national leaders like ex-President Clinton, through their disgusting lack of self - control coupled with their seemingly powerful influence on others, are bringing down hideous curses down on our people. According to the apostle Paul, lack of self - control as well as the cultivation of self - indulgent perversions would characterize large segments of our society living at the end times. Self - control caps off the list of the fruits of God's Holy Spirit. Self-control may be strengthened by (1) overcoming evil with good (2) loving others (3) putting on Christ and mortifying the flesh, bringing every thought into captivity to God's Commandments, through God's Holy Spirit.

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Sermon; Dec 14, 2002
Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the redemptive process, indicates that redemption obligates us to glorify God in our bodies and our spirit. Spiritually, we are literally owned by Christ and are duty bound to do what He asks. Hair length and clothing are outward indicators of a person's inner spiritual condition. Clothing serves as a testimony of what we are on the inside, reflecting our attitude and conduct. As Adam and Eve discovered, the intents of the heart cannot be hidden from God. Their clothing, consisting of sacrificed animal skins, to conceal their shame prefigures Christ's sacrifice to cover our sins. We advertise the contents of our hearts by what we wear. Unfortunately lust and sexual perversion fueled by discontentment drive the tastes of much the fashion industry. What we wear automatically influences our behavior. Like hair length, our clothing also indicates God ordained gender distinction.

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Sermon; Aug 31, 2002
Sanctification and the Teens

Directing his comments to teenagers and young people, John Ritenbaugh focuses on the epidemic of Adolescent Invincibility Disorder Syndrome, an affliction in which young people foolishly imagine themselves to be invincible and impervious to harm. Young people in the church must realize that not only is God's law no respecter of persons, but also sanctification can be lost. Young people must aim at self-mastery and self-discipline, developing patience, thinking ahead to the consequences of behavior. God's law proscribes death for a young person who curses his parents, and being cut off from God's divine guidance has just as deadly a consequence. Young people need to cultivate early the habit of remembering God, embracing His law as their code of life.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; August 2001
Eating: How Good It Is! (Part Six)

We live in a society where both food and information are readily available. John Ritenbaugh discusses the importance of mastering self-control and a true Christian's necessity of seeking truth by which to live his life.

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Article; July 2001
The Buck Stops Here

Do we tend to shirk responsibility by 'passing the buck'? David Maas explores why we do this and proposes a solution for shouldering our responsibilities—and growing in character.

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Sermon; May 19, 2001
How Emotions Affect Spiritual Maturity

Martin Collins warns that none of us can achieve spiritual growth without controlling the emotions. Though God has created humans with a mind to work in tandem with the emotional impulses (prompts to action), too many of us have, according to Daniel Goleman in his book "Emotional Intelligence," allowed the amygdala (emotions) to run roughshod over the cerebral cortex (mind), allowing anger (and other negative emotions) to get out of control. God displays anger (as well as other emotions), but always in controlled measured response, unlike the out-of-control childish rage of humans. Using God's Spirit (2 Timothy 1:7) the spirit of a sound mind, we can grow into emotional (not emotionless) spiritual maturity, exercising our senses through God's Law, searching the deep things of God (1 Corinthians 2:10), controlling feelings and passions with the mind of Christ. (1 Corinthians 2:16)

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Ready Answer; May 2001
Are You Sharp-Tongued? (Part One)

The tongue is maybe the most untamed "beast" on earth! James says we all offend in word. But James 3 is filled with wisdom regarding how we can overcome the beast.

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Bible Study; March 2001
Overcoming (Part 8): Self-Indulgence

Few human faults can hinder Christian overcoming like self-indulgence. If we can learn to control our desires, we are a long way toward living a godly life.

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Sermon; Aug 12, 2000
Maintaining Good Health (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon several abuses of one of God's gifts to mankind — eating and drinking. While drunkenness and gluttony indicate self-centeredness, lack of discipline, often leading to poverty and ill health, moderation in all things is the way to glorify God in our bodies. God's called out ones must exercise moderation in their approach to eating of food, imbibing of alcohol, and excesses of anything in which there might be a possibility of borderline conduct. God has provided the blessing of (1) family union, (2) food and drink, (3) clothing, and (4) work with the condition that we exercise responsible stewardship over these gifts practicing moderation in all things.

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Bible Study; November 1998
Self-Control

No government—not even God's—can work without self-control. As a fruit of God's Spirit, this virtue may be the single hardest to master over the course of a lifetime, yet we need it to do our parts in God's Kingdom.

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Article; February 1998
The Importance of Follow-Through

Just as important as follow-through is in an athletic motion, its spiritual counterpart is vital to our life in Christ. We must have the will and commitment to carry our devotion to God through to the very end.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; December 1992
Here's to Your Good Health!

Maintaining good health is a vital part of our duty to glorify God in our bodies. We should study health and ourselves so we can keep the temple of the Holy Spirit healthy and do good for others.


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