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Trumpets

Go to Bible verses for: Trumpets

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Sermonette; Feb 3, 2018
Extreme Environmentalism and National Security

Charles Whitaker, focusing on Ezekiel 7:14, a chilling description of a summons to battle followed by a cowardly refusal to defend the home country, points out that this prophecy pertains to the nations of modern Israel. The descendants of Jacob have spent billions of dollars creating state-of-the-art weapons. Ironically, as early as the 1950s, the Rand Corporation advanced wrong-headed proposal for America's "orderly capitulation" in the event of nuclear attack, suggesting that surrender would forestall widescale (and perhaps irreparable) environmental degradation through radiation and nuclear winter. Environmental extremists have now burrowed their way into the seats of national policy-making, as evidenced by a top-ranking general who recently boasted—under oath—that he would defy any orders to use nuclear weapons if he felt they were issued contrary to his interpretation of international law. Looked at this way, extreme environmentalism, untampered by a thoroughgoing respect for American values and lives, is a clear-and-present danger to national security. Knowing of her self-advertised reticence to protect herself, Israel's enemies need not await a period of military weakness to mount a successful attack. Attack could come today; Jacob's Trouble could commence tomorrow.

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Sermon; Oct 3, 2016
Reconciliation (Part Two): Christ's Work

Richard Ritenbaugh, using the metaphor of "balancing" a checkbook, wherein two totally distinct documents, the user's register and the bank's statement are squared, or brought into agreement, explains Christ's work of "squaring" us—that is justifying us - before God. Through one man (Adam), mankind was condemned, but through Christ (the second Adam) we are justified and reconciled. After reconciliation, there can finally be a meeting of minds as we are fashioned into a new creation, invited to sit in heavenly places. As a work in progress, created for good works, we will ultimately be just like Him. If we faithfully use His Holy Spirit, we will be part of the first-born, qualified to receive our inheritance of eternal life in the family of God. Christ's work at Calvary reconciled us to God, setting in motion a process which will eventually bring the entire creation into reconciliation with God the Father. Currently, the entire creation groans in agony awaiting the liberation from corruption. The Feast of Trumpets anticipates the return of Jesus Christ to this earth, having resurrected the dead saints and receiving the living saints at His coming, a day which harkens back to the time when the Law was originally given to the Israelites, a time when Mount Sinai was covered with smoke, when trumpets resounded, and the people were terrified, shocked to learn how powerful their God really was. The events preceding Christ's return will be exceedingly terrifying to those who oppose Him, but welcome to the displaced remnant who will finally be allowed to return to their homeland. God will then pour out His spirit upon them, rendering their hearts pliable, submissive, and deeply repentant for their transgressions.

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Sermon; Sep 14, 2015
Psalms: Book Three (Part Five)

Richard Ritenbaugh asks us to consider how we would discipline a recalcitrant, obstinate child, examining a repertoire of techniques from harsh to indulgent, reminding us that good parents should have a whole quiver of solutions, not just a carrot or a stick. The children of Jacob have throughout history behaved like spoiled brats, perennially earning God's wrath and discipline. Yom Teruah, the Day of Trumpets, pictures a shout of warning, a time of gloominess and dread, the Day of the Lord in the valley of decision, the great tribulation when God's wrath will be poured upon mankind, a curse they bring on themselves. Sadly many in God's Church will also ignore the warning, reaping the consequences of their lack of submission. God is full of grief that it has come to this sad state of apostasy. Our worship on the Day of Trumpets should constitute praise and worship, extolling the attributes, blessings, and promises of God. The Feasts of God establish God's statutes, laws, testimonies, ordinances, and rulings. If we would keep God's Feasts properly, we would be in sync with God's noble purpose for us, defending us from falling into apostasy and idolatry. God tested physical Israel and is continuing to test spiritual Israel, the Israel of God. We dare not imitate the rebellion of our forebears on the Sinai who fell into idolatry, but rather must hallow God and keep His Commandments.

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Sermonette; Apr 10, 2015
The Faith of Israel

David Grabbe, reminding us that the trek through the Red Sea occurred on the seventh day of Unleavened Bread, points out that other historical events also occurred on that day, including the toppling of the walls of Jericho and the healing of the lame man near the Pool of Bethsaida, after his having endured his infirmity 38 years. The ancient Israelites moved in the desert but had made no progress in getting Egypt out of their hearts. When God restored Israel through Joshua, He gave them credit for the time that had walked, indicating that in all cases, He was doing virtually all the heavy lifting, but was demanding that the Israelites exercise faith, doing something concrete to indicate their willingness to participate in the covenant. The walls of Jericho were, in effect, already history when Joshua's men began their march around the city. When we make our covenant with God, we must move forward exercising faith, doing our part in the overcoming/ sanctification process, realizing God is in charge of the entire process.

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Sermon; Sep 25, 2014
Psalms: Book Four: He Is Coming!

Richard Ritenbaugh, focusing upon Book IV of the Psalms, corresponding with the fall festivals, singles out the Feast of Trumpets for its themes and imagery, as well as the Summary Psalm 149. Trumpets could be considered the opening salvo of the fall feasts, beginning with a blast of the trumpet or shofar, reminiscent of the event on Mount Sinai in which God visited His people, brought the Law, and brought righteous judgment—an event which depicts another judgment coming upon the earth following the Seventh Trumpet and the seven trumpet plagues or bowls of judgment in which God will shake the earth and destroy those whose goal has been to destroy the earth, and a time when Christ will claim His Bride and the Marriage of the Lamb will commence. Psalm 91 anticipates the Day of the Lord, the return of Christ coming for judgment, and destruction, but also putting a protective hedge around His people. Psalm 90, written by Moses, wistfully asks how long it will be before this condition of temporariness can be turned to eternal life. Psalm 91, perhaps also written by Moses, discusses a kind of place of refuge in which the protected saints can view the destruction of Satan's evil system. Psalm 94 seems to reflect the point of view of saints not in a place of safety, anxiously waiting for the end of times of tribulation. The key to weathering these fearful times is drawing close to God with a view of emulating His life and getting to know Him, preparing for rulership in His Kingdom.

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Sermon; Sep 30, 2008
Lift Up Your Voice Like a Trumpet

Richard Ritenbaugh, suggesting that nothing is more dramatic than the blast of a trumpet, notes that alarm or warning is a primary function of a horn. Israel, spread out over a huge area, used a complex system of trumpet blasts to convey lifesaving information. Silver trumpets were used to call assembly, to direct movement, to call to war, to signal days of gladness, Holy days, new moons, sacrifices and offerings, announcing Jubilee, worship, and the coronation of a king. One of the reasons for the blowing of trumpets is a memorial of a past significant event, Yom Teruah, depicting the covenant relationship with God, a time to glorify and praise God. The second reason was to give direction, to advance into battle, or to take refuge. The third reason to blow the trumpet was to make an announcement, announcing a significant event like the Jubilee or the first and second coming of Israel's king and Messiah. A fourth use of the trumpet blast is to provide warning, motivating us to repent and to protect us from cataclysmic upheaval and the dreadful Day of the Lord and God's wrath, a time no one can endure without God's supernatural protection.

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Prophecy Watch; August 2007
The Second Exodus (Part Two)

The fact of a Second Exodus that will far eclipse the Exodus from Egypt is generally understood by Bible students. The timing of this great migration, however, is more elusive. David Grabbe points out the Scriptural markers that narrow the time frame to a specific, significant prophetic event.

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Ready Answer; August 2005
What Is the Feast of Trumpets, Anyway?

The Feast of Trumpets, the first of the fall holy days, has perhaps the least directly written about it of all God's festivals. To provide some answers, this article explains the basic facts about this pivotal day.

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Sermon; Sep 27, 2003
The Seventh Trumpet

Richard Ritenbaugh discusses the pivotal holy day, the Feast of Trumpets, a day looking back to three holy days in which God deals with individuals and looks forward to three holy days in which God works with progressively larger groups. This day is a memorial of shouting or blowing of trumpets. Teruw'ah (the shout of the shofar) is often associated with the sound of war, symbolizing the Day of the Lord, the real war to end all wars, the time Christ will subdue and render judgment to all the evil hostile forces (governments under Satan's influence) on the earth, bringing rewards to His called out ones. Although these events will take place with relative quickness and speed, the whole time sequence will take some time to completely unfold. If we remain faithful, this day will have a positive outcome.

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CGG Weekly; Sep 26, 2003
'I Will Come Again'

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  ...The date on our calendar is not as important as the day itself. On it is the first autumnal new moon, which in most years marks the holy day called by the Jews Rosh Hashanah. This Hebrew phrase, however, obscures the significance of the day, as it simply means "the beginning of the year"--and the Jews keep it primarily as a New Years' celebration. The Bible calls it "a memorial of blowing of trumpets" (Leviticus 23:24), and thus we call it simply the "Feast of Trumpets." ...

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Sermon; Mar 29, 2003
Shock and Awe - and Speed

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the shock and awe bombardment in Iraq, focuses upon the original shock and awe display on Mount Sinai, as well as the ultimate shock and awe campaign the world will experience at the second coming of Christ. Descriptions of this calamitous event abound throughout the Psalms and prophecies, depicting in awesome graphic detail the carnage and destruction of the Day of the Lord—the time of which no one knows! When these events begin to unfold (like a thief in the night), they will occur at meteoric speed. We dare not be caught sleeping but must show continual vigilance.

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Sermon; Sep 14, 1996
Sin (Part 4)

In this powerful conclusion of the sin series, John Ritenbaugh warns that, contrary to the syrupy, unctious Protestant teaching of Christianity as a warm fuzzy feeling- a cakewalk into eternal life, true Christianity is a life and death struggle- spiritual warfare against our flesh (Romans 8:7, Galatians 5:17), the world (1John 2:16-17) and a most formidable intelligent spirit being (I Peter 5:8). Using the abundant military metaphors of Paul and Christ, we must prepare ourselves for rigorous, continuous battle (Ephesians 6:11-17) waging a war against these three enemies, enabling us to eat of the tree of (eternal) life (Revelation 2:7).

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Bible Study; June 1996
Holy Days: Trumpets

The Feast of Trumpets sounds a dire warning of war on the one hand and triumph for God and His saints on the other. Our goal now is to be prepared for that day when Christ returns!

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; August 1995
God's Promises Are Sure!

Using primarily the story of Joseph, John Ritenbaugh expounds the lessons we can learn and the encouragement we can glean from God's dealings with men during the time of the Feast of Trumpets.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Trumpets



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